The Hawk's Eye

Filed under Features, Showcase

How to Combat Senioritis

Aaron Goldsmith

Aaron Goldsmith

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






senioritis

noun [seen-your-eye-tis]

“A crippling disease that strikes high school seniors. Symptoms include: laziness, an over-excessive wearing of track pants, old athletic shirts, sweatpants, athletic shorts, and sweatshirts. Also features a lack of studying, repeated absences, and a generally dismissive attitude. The only known cure is a phenomenon known as Graduation.” (According to Urban Dictionary.)

 

It happens every year. Grades drop, attention lacks, and anticipation for graduation grows among the senior class. So, in order to avoid being rescinded from college, or not receiving your diploma on June 6th, pay attention seniors! Here are ten tips to combat your senioritis.

1) Limit yourself to one episode on Netflix a night.

2) Study with Laura Cook.

3) Get a pep-talk from Fern.  Or Kate.

4) Avoid Mr. VonK’s homework “strategies.”

5) Study with Laura Cook.

6) Don’t read The Stranger.

7) First period starts at 8.25.

8) Cook her dinner, then study with Laura.

9) Try to avoid Michael Weiss.

10) This.

Filed under Features, Showcase

Movies to See This Year

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






There are many good movies coming out in 2015. Among them is Star Wars, premiering on December 18, 2015. One Freshman, Grayson Tupper said, “I’m pumped for Star Wars, I don’t know why it’s not coming out on May 4.” Another couple of movies that are coming including American Sniper, Age of Ultron, and Fast and Furious 7. These movies are what a lot of people that like action movies want to see when they come out. On the other hand there are a few family movies coming out that include Minions, The SpongeBob Movie, and the Peanuts movie. One comedy that Evie Bond wants to see is Pitch Perfect 2, “I really want to see Pitch Perfect 2. Fat Amy is my favorite.” Over all this year will be filled with movies that will make us laugh and movies that will make us cry.

Filed under Features

What to Get Your Peers for Christmas

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






In these busy weeks leading up to winter break, one of the annual highlights is the secret snowflake, secret santa, or secular snowman exchange. You may get excited at first, as you find out who you are giving gifts to, but then you are stuck on the question: what gift should I give? No matter if you were paired up with your best friend, or a person you have never spoken to, you can find a great affordable gift that anyone would like. If you are truly stumped on what to get, you can always be safe with food. Candy is especially popular, since most everyone would like a bag of sour patch kids, chocolate bar, or a pack of gum. Any food will work as well. When you are at the grocery store, simply grab some packaged cookies or candy at a reasonable price. You could even bake cookies or other food yourself.  If you can not decide what candy or food they would like, ask a friend to find out. If you want to give a gift other than food, fuzzy socks are especially nice. They will last longer than candy, and are a great seasonal gift for the winter. As a backup, if you do not know the person at all, it is always safe to give an iTunes or Starbucks gift card for five to ten dollars. It is also nice to buy school supplies for a gift since everyone needs pens and pencils. These are some safe ideas, that everyone will probably like. Happy holidays!

Screen Shot 2014-12-09 at 10.34.04 AMScreen Shot 2014-12-09 at 10.34.53 AM

Screen Shot 2014-12-09 at 10.34.13 AMScreen Shot 2014-12-09 at 10.35.00 AM

Screen Shot 2014-12-09 at 10.34.18 AM

Filed under Features, Showcase

The Stress and Accomplishment of National Novel Writing Month

http://www.grammarly.com/blog/2012/happy-day-one-of-national-novel-writing-month/

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






This November, hundreds of thousands of people will participate in National Novel Writing Month, NaNo for short, in which the goal is fairly simple: write a novel in 30 days.  More specifically, the National Novel Writing Month organization challenges everyone to write 50,000 words, an ambitious undertaking for anyone who has work, school, or really any kind of outside commitment whatsoever.  And yet many people, including a handful of students at the School, meet the goal, or “win”, every year.

In order to write 50,000 words in 30 days, one must write an average of about 1,667 words every day.  Add that to time spent on school, after-school activities, commute, homework, meals, and sleep, and you have a serious time-management predicament.  Senior Charlotte Merzbacher, a four-time participant and three-time winner, said, “I usually get up at 6:15 and write for half an hour every morning, which allows me to finish about half of my daily word count goal.  However, you do have to sacrifice some sleep, studying, and time with friends to finish a novel in a month.”  For many, the enormous writing project conflicts too heavily with other commitments.  Senior Andy Pelos, who was considering participating this year, admitted, “With the full extent of my classes, college applications, and the rest of my life, I ended up deciding against it.”

But while it is immensely challenging to keep up with novel-writing and real life simultaneously, it is an undoubtedly beneficial project in many ways.  “I use [NaNo] to get ideas on paper,” Merzbacher continued, “Sometimes, under the pressures of school you don’t get to write, so NaNo gives you an assignment or an excuse to write and prioritize writing over schoolwork… If I have words on the page I can edit them.  And finishing a novel is a huge confidence boost.”  According to their mission statement, the NaNo organization aims to help “children and adults find the inspiration, encouragement, and structure they need to achieve their creative potential… [and] foster self-expression while building community on local and global levels.”

Last year alone, over 310,000 participants completed the challenge and ended the month of November as novelists.  While you cannot, according to the rules, begin writing the actual body of text before November 1st, pre-NaNo prep is greatly encouraged.  Next year, don’t wait until halfway through the month to start planning your novel.  It is never too early to let out your inner author.  “November kind of snuck up on me,” Pelos continued, “I never had enough time to fully plan out my story and characters.  I’ll be ready next year.”  Will you be ready too?

Filed under Features

Navigating the Traumas of Black Friday

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






Get ready Jayhawks, it is almost Black Friday. This time, as usual, Black Friday is (coming up the day after Thanksgiving) on the 28th of November. So, if you’re looking to save a lot of money, get ready to be spending your Thanksgiving in lines in front of Walmart, Target and Best Buy. Shoppers all over the nation will fight their way through to the front to get their hands on this year’s hot sale items. Some people might even wait weeks to get in line to buy gifts before they sell out.

Black Friday is known to provide great deals, but there has also been news of stealing and other illegal actions occurring in years past. Still, people are so determined to buy their gifts with a deal that they even wait weeks in front of the stores and camp out. There are many strategies people use to become the first people to lay their hands on some cheap items, including knowing where to buy them and when. Is it better to shop at places where you know you won’t have to deal with crowded stores? If one wants to stay away from the chaos it could be smarter to shop online? These are things one must consider before preparing to shop for Black Friday.

When one is able to land on some items, they can land on big deals. For instance, one can save hundreds of dollars on laptops that can be as cheap as $200, or possibly save money on a deep fryer to cook some chicken for cheap during dinner. Sophomore Amy Lin stated, “This Black Friday will be my first and I guess I’m kinda excited, but not at the same time. I don’t want to wait in line with all the other people buying stuff, but still, I get to save a lot more money than I would when I buy it on a normal day.”

Are you prepared to go shopping on Black Friday?

Filed under Features, Showcase

Ten Thanksgiving Foods Ranked from Best to Worst

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






Eat up, kids.

 

1. Pumpkin Pie

pumpkin-pie

You can never go wrong with pumpkin pie! The store-bought ones and homemade pies are equally as good.

 

2. Mashed Potatoes

imgres

Mashed potatoes are always really good, but for some reason, they just taste especially really good on Thanksgiving. They are a hundred times better than any other potato dish

 

3. Sweet Potato Casserole

Sweet-Potato-Casserole

It is a combination of the top two: pumpkin pie and mashed potatoes.

 

4. Cranberry Sauce

imgres-3
It is just amazing.

 

5. Turkey

imgres-4

It may be a classic, but it is just a big chicken.

 

6. Gravy

imgres-5

It is made from all the fat drippings which is kind of gross, but it still tastes pretty good.

 

7. Stuffing

imgres-6

What even is in “stuffing”? Also, soggy bread is gross.

 

8. Green Beans

imgres-1

Is this really a Thanksgiving food? Or do we just have it because we need a green vegetable on the table to balance out all the starch?

 

9. Cornbread

imgres-7

I thought this only went with Chili.

 

10. Tofurkey

imgres-2

Even vegetarians and vegans hate this!

Filed under Features, Showcase

Remember Summer? Here’s How We Spent It

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






Summer, a word that evokes both panic and excitement, provides a limited time period to spend more time exploring your interests outside of school, improving or learning a skill, traveling, meeting new people, and getting ahead academically, as well as stressing over exams and applications. You probably know what your friends did over summer break, but what about other people at the School? I myself was curious as to how the Upper School spent its summer break, and whether there were any notable trends, so I sent out a survey. Before I launch into a bunch of graphs and analysis and percentages, a few things need to be taken into account. The overall data is slightly skewed, since 42% of the respondents are Seniors, with a 90% participation rate. The other grades each made up less than 20% of the respondents, with a 36-37% response rate for each grade, so the data is mainly affected by the Senior responses.

Additionally, 57% of the respondents are female, 40% male, and 3% other, so the data is representative of the female population at the School.
Traveling:
Summer is by far the most convenient time for traveling, especially for longer periods of time. There are no tests, homework, or projects to worry about making up, and you don’t have to worry about texting 10 different people to get the notes for your five demanding classes. Looking at the data, people in the Upper School do plenty of traveling, both inside and outside of the United States. Out of the 180 responses, students visited 36 different states, and 44 different countries. The top ten most frequented states were:

1. New York
2. Massachusetts
3. Hawaii
4. Utah
5. Illinois
6. Connecticut
7. Rhode Island
8. Washington
9. New Jersey
10. Oregon

There was also one avid traveler who went through all the East Coast states from Maine to Florida.
The top ten countries visited by respondents were:

1. France
2. Costa Rica
3. Germany
4. Great Britain
5. Mexico
6. China
7. Italy
8. Japan
9. Spain
10. Canada
And although not listed, exactly one student visited Argentina, Belgium, Bosnia, Botswana, Croatia, Egypt, Ghana, Hong Kong, Indonesia, Kyrgyzstan, Morocco, New Zealand, Russia, Scotland, Singapore, South Africa, Switzerland, Thailand, The British Virgin Islands, Vietnam, Zambia, and Zimbabwe.
21% of the girls who traveled and 32% of the boys who traveled visited only other states, while 36% of girls and 19% of boys visited only other countries. And the same percentage of boys and girls (15%) visited both other countries and and other states. Out of the total of 126 visits to other countries, girls made 62% while boys made 36%.
As school gets more demanding, there is less time for travel. While around 82% of 9th and 10th graders traveled to either other states, countries, or both, that number decreased to 74% for 11th graders, and 58% for 12th graders.
Pastimes:
As one progresses through high school, one often wants to become more independent from one’s immediate family. During the summer, 72% of Freshmen spent most of their summer with immediate family, a percentage which continually decreases through the grades. 61% of Sophomores spent their summer mainly with immediate family, which falls to 59% for Juniors and 54% for Seniors. Out of all the respondents, only one person spent their summer with a host family, 3% spent time with distant relatives, 36% with people at a camp, and 60% with immediate family. More boys stayed with their immediate families (62%) than girls (58%).
When respondents who spent time with new people were compared to those who stayed with immediate family, they showed a 2-point-lower average on a 10- point scale of time spent “Doing Nothing”, a 1-point-lower interest in computers, a 1-point-lower interest in watching TV, and a half-point-higher interest in hanging out with friends. Also, people who traveled graded time spent meeting new people one point higher and time spent eating 0.5 points higher than those who didn’t travel.
Summer also gives us more time to enjoy the simpler pleasures of life, such as eating, sleeping, and hanging around. On a scale of one to 10, time spent eating and sleeping ranked the highest out of all the other pleasures, averaging 7.8 and 7.2 points respectively. The other leisure activities averaged the following number of points: spending time on computer – 6.7; watching TV/computer – 6.4; hanging out with friends – 6.3; texting – 5.6; meeting new people – 5.5; doing nothing – 4.6; shopping – 3.8; sleepovers – 3.3; partying – 3.0; and concerts – 2.2.
Overall, girls love watching TV more than boys, with girls on average rating enjoyment as 6.8 points and boys 5.8. Girls enjoyed texting more over the summer, giving an average enjoymeny level of 6.2 points versus the 4.9 point average for boys. Girls enjoyed concerts and shopping more so than boys, giving 2.6 and 4.4 points respectively, while boys gave 1.8 and 3.1 points respectively. Boys liked hanging out more with friends however, and they gave an average of 6.6 points, while girls gave 6.1 points. They also valued sleepovers more than girls (3.3 points average vs. 0.5), and sleep (7.4 vs. 7.0).
While most pleasures were graded similarly by all grades, eating was given the highest average of points (8.5) by the 11th grade. 11th graders also liked to watch TV more, giving it 7.2 points, 1.5 points higher than the lowest average of 5.7 given by the 10th graders. Hanging out with friends drops from highest average of 6.7 in 10th grade to 5.8 in 11th grade, and meeting new people drops from highest 6.5 in 10th grade to 4.6 in 11th grade.
A need for sleep gradually drops from 7.5 in 9th grade to 6.8 in 12th grade. Doing nothing isn’t that fun anymore in 12th grade and drops from 5.3 in 9th grade to 4.1 in 12th grade. Watching TV and texting lose their attractiveness in 12th grade: watching TV dropped from 7.2 in 11th grade to 6.2 in 12th grade, and texting dropped from 6.1 in 11th grade to 5.4 in 12th. Compared to other grades, Sophomores give significantly higher ratings to hanging out with friends, meeting new people, sleepovers, and concerts and give lowest grades to “Watching TV” and “Spending time on Computer”. Freshmen, when compared to other grades, have the highest averages for shopping, doing nothing, and partying. They probably want to live out their lives before the stress of Junior year sets in. They also have the lowest point average for going to concerts.

Participating in Educational Programs, Arts, and Sports
95% of the respondents participated in educational programs, arts, sports, internships, and jobs, while 5% admitted to doing none of these activties. 41% of students were in some kind of educational program. Overall, 56% of girls and 40% of boys were in educational programs.
A focus on STEM subjects was evident among the main educational programs students took, the top ten listed below:
1. Science
2. Math
3. Engineering
4. Writing
5. Computer Science
6. Debate
7. Cooking
8. French
9. Psychology
10. Robotics

The computer science students studied a wide range of programming, including Java HTML, Security, Tech Support, and Web Design. Some of the less popular, yet nontheless interesting programs taken include: 3D-modeling for video games, Arc Welding, Architecture, Business and Entrepreneurship, Christian Evangelism, Film, Foreign Policy, Human Rights, Law, and Metal Working.
While only a couple of 9th and 10th graders prepared for the SAT, 57% of 11th graders and 50% of 12th graders prepared for the ACT or SAT. Of those who prepared for tests, 66% were girls and 34% were boys. And 53% of those who prepared for standardized tests were also in the following programs: Science, Engineering, Math, Writing, French, Architecture, Debate, and Human Rights. And of the Seniors who studied for a test, 63% were girls and 37% were boys.
The respondents took part in a total of 10 different types of artistic activities, listed below by populatiry:
1. Singing
2. Dancing
3. Visual Arts (Graphic Design, Drawing, Painting)
4. Drama
5. Musical Instruments
6. 3D Printing
7. Choir
8. Interaction Design
9. Jazz Ensemble
10. Metal Working
58% of the people who participated in the arts were girls, 39% were boys, and 3% were other. 32% of Seniors, 29% of Juniors, and 23% of Sophomores participated in the arts.

The top ten sports played by the Upper School students were:

1. Soccer
2. Tennis
3. Basketball
4. Cross Country
5. Swimming
6. Baseball
7. Football
8. Golf
9. Lacrosse
10. Softball
As they move up the grade levels, fewer people play sports. Participants started at 27% of Freshmen, 20% of Sophomores, 14% of Juniors, and ended at a sudden increase of 36% of seniors playing sports over the summer. Out of those who played soccer, the most popular sport over the summer, 50% were boys, 43% were girls, and 7% were other.
One of the respondents participated in an unbelievable number of athletic activties. This diverse ahtlete practiced ice climbing, frisbee, ice hockey, martial arts, ping pong, rugby, sailing, sea kayaking, skateboarding, skiing, track, and water polo.
19% of the respondents were involved in jobs, internships, and/or volunteer work. Students worked in different positions, such as assisting with technology, teaching robotics, working at a cardiovascular center, and working at a theater company. In many cases, the nature of the job or internship wasn’t reported.
Out of the people who worked and interned, 51% were girls, 43% were boys, and 6% were other. Out of the 10th grade respondents, none of them claimed to have worked over the summer.
Lastly, ¼ of respondents prepared for a permit or driving test. Of this ¼, 55.5% were girls, 40% were boys, and 4.5% were other. Only one freshman prepared for a permit/driving test. As for the other three grades, the number of people who prepared for a permit/driving test was distributed more or less evenly.
In all, while this survery isn’t entirely accurate, it still presents some interesting facts and trends about the Upper School as a whole, as well as different genders and grades.

Filed under Features, Showcase

What Advice Should Seniors Keep In Mind During the Application Process?

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






As the Early-Action deadline approaches, college is a prevalent topic around the School. In order to quell rumors about the application process and help the current Seniors push through this final stretch, the Hawk’s Eye interviewed a number of Upper School teachers about their experiences in applying to college.

Madam Bourdet- “They need to know that it’s gonna take longer than they think, so don’t overestimate how fast you can work. But in the end, it will always work out.”

Mr. Fraser- “I think that the US has several hundred of the best colleges and universities, and Head Royce Students are going to have good choices no matter what. “Dream School” is a misnomer because kids who have a dream school are usually just fascinated by the allure of a name, yet they can get the same education at many other schools. Sometimes, students can have better experiences at universities other than their dream schools because they are often more personalized.”

Mrs. Lehman- “Remember, it’s not your life. Everyone is going to go to college. It really doesn’t matter which college you go to because it’s what you make out of the experience that’s important.”

Mrs. Miller- “I think it’s important to not try to change yourself to try to fit what you think the college wants. Do your best to portray who you really are in your college application. Be authentic.”

Mrs. Temple- “It’s important to stay confident in who you are and not try to change the way you portray yourself in order to trick a school into accepting you. Be as honest as you can so that the right school will end up picking you.”

Mr. Scott- “Exercise is good for your brain. Spending time in nature is good for your soul.”

Senora Diaz- “The college counselors have a lot of experience and students need to trust and follow their advice. By contacting former students, I know that they are happy with the schools that they end up attending. Don’t stress out, work hard, and you’ll be fine.”

Filed under Features, Showcase

Sophomore Boat Races

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






Filed under Features, Showcase

The Fantasy Dunk Tank Line-up

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






Every year at the School, at the Halloween fair, there is a dunk tank. And every year, in the dunk tank, there is a teacher. Some students and one faculty member shared their opinions about who they would like to see in the dunk tank.

Paul Ostrach: “Corey”

Wyatt Clancy: “Mr. Harper”

Kyle Russell: “Ms. Metz”

Donovan Redd: “Fern”

Jemma Baus: “Mr. Evans”

Natasha Skov: “Dr. Kinney”

Jake Benham: “Ms. Butterfield”

Dejah Hilliard: “Ms. Glogover”

Nico Hoerner: “Dr. Enelow”

Daniel Lee: “Ms. Metz”

And finally Nancy Fiedelman: “Ms. Metz”

It looks like there is a favorite for this years dunk tank.

Filed under Features, Showcase

Teachers’ Views on Snacks-N-Class

Student+demonstrates+how+his+cookie+renews+his+strength
Student demonstrates how his cookie renews his strength

Student demonstrates how his cookie renews his strength

Young Lee

Young Lee

Student demonstrates how his cookie renews his strength

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






At the beginning of the year, most teachers give out the class guidelines and in that some teachers state that eating is absolutely not allowed, like Dr. Enelow. Some teachers leave it open ended. You just have to find out yourself. So, to prevent that awkward moment where you pull out your food and the teacher says no, here are some teachers answers to the question: What’s your food policy?

Mr. Van: “I think my policy is no food, or at least that’s what it says in the rule book, but I also allow for exceptions, like for FADE people, or someone in a meeting. Also, I hate when people leave plates behind in the classroom.”

Mr. Evans: “You can eat it, but don’t make a mess”

Ms. Metz: “It’s fine with me for students to eat in class, but I have three stipulations: it not be overly smelly, that it not be overly noisy, and the student takes his/ her trash with them, and I suppose also there could be a sort of disruption element. Also, usually the crunch thing, like crunching of carrots that drives me crazy.”

Naoko: “You can eat food in class, but my only requirement is that they don’t leave food in the class”

Dr. Brackman: “During lectures students can bring food in and eat it in class, but there’s a fee: I get some. Also, there’s not eating or drinking during labs.”

Filed under Features, Showcase

Events Around the Bay: Weekend of October 3rd

http://phishthoughts.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/07/dalai-lama-crowd.jpg

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






As the summer fades further and further into our memories, it becomes increasingly difficult to seek out “fun” in our busy, studious lives. Even when classes stop reviewing, and start teaching new material, it is important to find balance and still find ways to enjoy ourselves outside of school. Below is a list of activities one can partake in to take a study break, relax, and just let loose next weekend.

Friday, October 3:
5pm Friday Nights at the De Young, Golden Gate Park
6pm Art Murmur First Friday, Oakland
6:30pm Movie in the Park: “Frozen,” Redwood Heights Recreation Center in Oakland.
8pm Lorde Concert, Greek Theater
9pm Stromae Concert (to my french students out there), Mezzanine Venue, San Francisco

Saturday, October 4:
Lakeshore Farmer’s Market
11am Oaktoberfest, Dimond District, Oakland

Sunday, October 5:
Montclair Village Farmer’s Market
8pm SF Comedy Competition Punch Line San Francisco, San Francisco

Leave a Comment
Navigate Right
Navigate Left
  • How to Combat Senioritis

    Features

    Sydney’s Summer Movie Reviews

  • How to Combat Senioritis

    Features

    Student Feature: Awards and Recognition at the Global Online Academy Catalyst Conference

  • How to Combat Senioritis

    Spotlight

    March for Our Lives- A Feature of Student and Faculty Activists at HRS

  • How to Combat Senioritis

    3/14/18 Walkout

    March 14th Walkout Photo Gallery

  • How to Combat Senioritis

    Features

    QUIZ: What should your prom dress be based on your everyday style?

  • Features

    Fall TV Shows!!!!

  • How to Combat Senioritis

    Features

    Affinity Groups at The School

  • How to Combat Senioritis

    Features

    An Interview with Luis Terriquez: Being Latino at the School

  • How to Combat Senioritis

    Features

    Diversity in Admissions: A Chat With Christian Donovan

  • How to Combat Senioritis

    Features

    Microaggressions at the School

The student news site of Head-Royce School.
Features