The Hawk's Eye

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AJ’s Guide to How to Dress for Fall

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With the weather getting colder, it is no longer the time to wear your chubbies and bro-tanks. The summer clothes need to be put away, while the cardigans and flannels need to be dusted off. In order to keep you looking good during the fall season, the School has developed the top six fall outfits for 2014.

6) The Football Star
Varsity jacket, khakis, casual sneakers.

5) The Casual Man
American Apparel sweatshirt, khakis, and vans.

4) The Sophisticated Prepster
A pullover sweater, jeans, loafers.

3) The East Coaster
Cardigan, salmon pants, Sperry’s.

2) The Californian
North Face jacket, jeans, Nike free runs.

And number one…
The Classic
Flannel, jeans, Sperry’s.

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Pierce’s Space Food

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Senior Pierce Constanti has been experimenting with eating a new kind of food substitute called Soylent, or what some might call “space food.” When I heard about this, I was shocked and filled with questions. Constanti says that he learned about Soylent in a science magazine. The article described inventor Rob Rhinehart, who, in his early twenties ate too many unhealthy foods like hot dogs because he didn’t have enough money or time to choose healthy foods. After experimenting with various ingredients and formulas, Rhinehart came up with Soylent, which he sells as a cheaper, powdered, instant version of healthier food.
Inspired by Rhinehart’s story and invention, Constanti tried it. Constanti says, “it is an experiment to see whether or not this stuff has any value or if it is a worthless fad. Also, it is super easy. I can just pop off the cap, fill it with water, shake it and I have my lunch. No waiting in the cafe line.” He says he will be eating the space food for lunch for about a month, whether he likes it or not. When asked how Soylent tastes and what is in it, Constanti says “it fills me up, which is weird. It is a combination of flax seeds, hemp hearts, sesame seeds, white rice, dextrose, and a vitamin and mineral mix. It tastes better than it sounds. Imagine drinking water with white flour and sugar mixed in. The issue is the texture. It’s lumpy.” Constanti also mentioned that he has plenty of the powdered food (enough for about a month of lunches) and has enough to give some to others who would like to try it.

If you are interested in reading more about Soylent, here are two informational links:

http://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2014/04/the-man-who-would-make-eating-obsolete/361058/

http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/wonkblog/wp/2013/03/14/rob-rhinehart-has-a-crazy-plan-to-let-you-go-without-food-forever-it-just-might-work/

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Dance Etiquette of the 1900’s

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According to Correct Social Usage, a book written by the New York Society of Self-Culture in 1906, “A ball in the modern interpretation of the word is a prolonged, elaborate, formal and brilliant social function, beginning at half-past ten o’clock pm, at the very earliest, and lasting until three or four o’clock am.” Obviously people in the 1900’s really knew how to party. Below are a couple rules that men and women separately had to follow at social gatherings, including dances and balls, along with my own more modern translation.

Etiquette for Feminine Guests:
“A kind and clever hostess devotes great attention to the needs of shy and unattended girls; she sends her son or husband or masculine relative to take them out, dance with and introduce them; she goes through the rooms at supper time and gathers up the timid and lonely ones and takes them to the dining room; she allows no selfish young men to lounge in her doorways or hide in the smoking room.”

“A misguided yet well-meaning teacher devotes great attention to the needs of awkward and uncoordinated teenagers; they send one of their students to go dance with and introduce them; they go into the hallways and gather up the timid and lonely teenagers and take them to the dance floor; they don’t allow foolish guys to lounge in the corridor or hide in the bathroom and take part in ‘illicit’ activities.”

“A woman, on arriving at the scene of entertainment, goes at once to the dressing-room.”

“If you’re a girl, you should go to the bathroom right away to make sure your outfit or makeup wasn’t completely ruined on the way to the dance.”

“It is not permitted for a woman to refuse a dance to one man and give it to another, unless she has been previously engaged. She can, however, deny a dance to one and spend the time walking or talking with another. Having promised a dance, she cannot withdraw her promise unless the best excuse can be given and her regrets expressed. If for good reason she recalls a dance she must leave it to the disappointed gentlemen to decide whether he prefers to sit out the dance at her side or seek another partner. If he remains at her side she must grant him that privilege, else her excuses would seem to infer that she avoided the dance merely to escape his company.”

“If a girl rejects a guy’s offer to dance for a good reason, the guy gets to choose whether he asks another girl or awkwardly sits with the girl who rejected him. If he wants to sit with her, she has to say yes, because if she doesn’t, it will become pretty obvious that she just thinks he’s really annoying and was trying to avoid him the whole time.”

“A woman waits always to be sought out by her partners. If she is engaged beforehand for a dance and her partner fails to look her up, or thoughtlessly dances with another, she can regard herself as sorely injured and expect a profound apology and plausible explanation for the delinquency or the mistake.”

“As a girl, you have to wait for some guy to ask to dance with you, because obviously girls are just incapable of doing that themselves. And if a guy promises to dance with you, but forgets or ditches you for someone else, you have the right to make him pay!”

“When asked to dance, a woman’s reply should be: ‘With great pleasure’, or ‘This is too bad; I fear I am engaged ahead for everything’.”

“If a guys asks to dance with you, you either have to say ‘yes’, or find a polite way of saying ‘I’m so popular that you’re just gonna have to wait in line with 50 other guys until I can find the time to dance with you’.”

Etiquette for Masculine Guests:
“To balls given in the winter the masculine guests all wear white gloves, and these are put on in the dressing room and worn when dancing. Careful men, who fear that the slightest moisture of their hands might penetrate the kid and injure the waists and gloves of their fair partners, carry two pairs of white gloves to a ball, and assume a fresh pair in the middle of the evening.”

“If you sweat a lot, its okay to change gloves. Not only will you avoid looking gross, but you will avoid the disgust of your dancing partner too.”

“When a gentleman asks the privilege of serving as a lady’s escort to a ball or dance he must provide the means of conveyance to and from the scene of festivity.”

“If you want to take a girl to a dance, you better have a limo or a carriage or something to get her there and back. Basically, nothing has changed.”

“If she has not been claimed by any one, her escort must perform the service of leading her to the dining room and satisfying her appetite.”

Honestly this whole sentence just sounds wrong.

“The man who attends a ball and does not dance, because of genuine ignorance or because he realizes that he is an inferior exponent of the terpsichorean art, may still render himself useful to his hostess and welcome among the guests by asking the women to walk or talk with him and by serving as an escort to the supper table.”

“If you suck at dancing, that’s okay because girls like guys with nice personalities too.”

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Teachers’ Remember Fallout in Years Past

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Every August, Head-Royce students start the new school year off with Fallout, a grade-wide trip to bond with classmates and ease back into school. Students in the Upper School participate in only four of these trips, but teachers are able to return year after year. Because teachers go on so many more Fallouts than students do, they accumulate relatively wild Fallout stories over the years, as well as a collection of cheerful back-to-school memories.
As is often the case with any kind of trip, some of the School’s teachers’ most memorable Fallout experiences were negative ones. For instance, Head of Upper School Carl Thiermann’s most unforgettable Fallout incident was after a river rafting trip, when students and faculty were waiting for buses to take them home. “Everybody was eager to go home,” Thiermann said, “and the buses didn’t come… it was about 110 degrees, [and] the bus driver had gotten totally lost and was somewhere near Yosemite, so I had to go… up on the highway… and I waited for two to three hours for those buses to come.”
Dean of Students Barry Barankin had quite an adventure on the water itself. “There was a point where the river was fairly low,” he recounted, “and there weren’t any rapids right there, but it was still moving pretty fast, and we were very clear with the kids that they shouldn’t get out of the boats at all.” One student, however, did get out of his boat, and began to walk upriver towards Barankin’s boat. “Our boat hit him,” he continued, “and he went under the boat, and then we were expecting him to come up somewhere, and he didn’t come up, and he didn’t come up, and finally our guide… reaches down around the boat… and then just pulls him up with one hand, just rips him out of the water, and back in our boat.”
While many teachers most clearly recall incidents such as the above, others think first of the more peaceful ones. Fine Arts teacher Bob Wells, for instance, said his most memorable Fallout experience was “my first time at Mountain Camp, with ninth graders… it was so wonderful, and it’s inspirational, and it’s still that way for all the people that come up for their first time.” Despite the occasional hiccup, Fallout is all in all an incredible opportunity for students and faculty alike.

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How Should You Spend, or Not Spend, Your Free Period?

Student+poses+for+the+picture...
Student poses for the picture...

Student poses for the picture...

Young Lee

Young Lee

Student poses for the picture...

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Most students at the School have at least one free period in their busy schedule. A free period is a 45 minute or 90 minute period during which students do not have class and have the opportunity to do anything they choose. For example, many students choose to spend their time socializing with friends on the patio or in the library and talking to peers about a variety of things. Students have a fun time relaxing and enjoying the time out of the classroom. Numerous other students finish homework or catch up on work that they did not finish. One Sophomore recommended going into the Quiet Room of the library to concentrate and finish work quickly. Hayley Dennings says she “usually just chills down on the patio or by the library and does any homework that [she hasn’t] done or read.” Juniors recommended, upperclassmen having off-campus privileges, that people use their free periods as opportunities to go off campus. Popular off-campus destinations include going to Montclair or Piedmont Avenue to popular food stops like Barney’s and Phantoms. Athletic students love to spend their free periods at the field, the tennis courts, or the basketball courts playing games. No matter if you have one free period or four, there is always something to do around campus.

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Hawk’s Eye Asks: How Should the School Spend the Budget?

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What should the school spend the budget on? I went around the school and asked students and teachers across the grade levels. Answers were all over the place, but there were definitely some sky-high ideas.

“More iPads for the lower schoolers because they definitely don’t have enough technology.” – Abby Judge, Junior

“Surf boards for every student” -Paul Scott, History teacher and Junior Dean

“Use the big patio doors to make an underground tunnel to a secret club” -Ben Anderson, Junior

“We need ziplines to get to different places. Or those gondola things like they have at Santa Cruz!” -Jen Brakeman, AP Biology teacher

“Activities Club!” -Davida Johnson and Alexis Popejoy, Seniors

“Water slides and zip lines from the parking lot to the highschool patio. Also a snowmaker for the winter and skis for every student. We will have a sledding hill down Lincoln.” -Rebecca Salsburg-Frank, Senior

“Pandas and cats in every classroom and better food that’s not for weird hippies. You can quote me on that.” -Remi Tupper, Junior

“Escalators.” -Rohaana Sarkar, Junior and Jayla Smith, Freshman

“All of the chairs should be those fluffy, plump massage chairs that you find in the mall.” -Mayfair Rucker, Freshman

“Servants.” -Natasha Skov, Junior

“Foot massages and a personal chef for all the teachers. Oh and a pony. I’ve always wanted a pony!” -Stevie Kaplan, English teacher

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Playlist of the Week: The Classics by Clayton Hill

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1) Lynyrd Skynyrd – Sweet Home Alabama
2) Creedence Clearwater Revival – Bad Moon Rising
3) The Rolling Stones – Gimme Shelter
4) The Eagles – Life in The Fast Lane
5) Boston – More Than a Feeling
6) Michael Jackson – Don’t Stop Till You Get Enough
7) Neil Diamond – Sweet Caroline
8) Billy Idol – Dancing With Myself
9) The Rolling Stones – Sympathy For The Devil
10) The Beach Boys – Do It Again
11) Three Dog Night – Joy To The World

 

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Jordan Perteet and Callista Wells’ Senior Project

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Soon-to-be graduating Seniors Jordan Perteet and Callista Welles are creating an album featuring Head-Royce students’ and friends for their Senior Project. They have shared with us their set list and a preview of some of the recorded tracks. The full album is planned to be released June 3rd on Senior Project Night.
Here is the track list:
1. I’ll Be Gone (Larry and His Flask Cover)- Cyber Mom (Noah Martin-Ruben, Zak Meghrouni-Brown, Asher Wolf, and Paul Davis)
2. Virus- Davis Delta (Davis Avila)
3. The Wolves (Bon Iver Cover)- Alex Browne, Gabe Gartland, PJ Robinson, Andre Boucher, Shivani Kaul, Leeza Lu, Pierce Constanti, Kendrick Baker, and Saane Halaholo (Miramonte High School)
4. Dreams (Fleetwood Mac Cover)- Olivia Won and Pippa O’Brien
5. Cross Out the Days- Emily Wong and Casey Yamamura
6. Hot Air Balloon- Ian Walters and Bobby Wirth
7. Beautiful Goodbyes- Gabe and His Mom (Pippa O’Brien, Gabe Gartland, Oba Seard-Evans, Ryan Kim, Orion Wells)​
And here’s a sneak peak:

 

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Favorite Parts of the School Year and Plans for the Summer

Aaron Goldsmith

Aaron Goldsmith

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There are many great things that happen throughout the school year. Some students and faculty members looked back on the year and shared their favorite parts. Teachers and students also shared what they’re looking forward to most about the summer since the school year is almost over.

 

Freshman Reuben Drogin: “My favorite part of the school year was health class, and I’m looking forward to summer school and math.”

 

Principle Carl Thierman: “I think the highlight of my year was the awesome senior play and directing my scene with Ms. Land. Frankly we just rocked.”

 

Senior Alex Wactor: “All the experiences I had with my fellow seniors like ditch day and the senior prank and the senior play, the things I did with my class all really came together. I’m really excited to be a camp counselor all summer.”

 

Junior Mason Montgomery: “I really liked getting closer with the juniors in my class and I am looking forward to prom. I’m really looking forward to working as a lifeguard this summer.”

 

Freshman Will Fitzhugh: “I don’t know.”

 

Senior Thomas Peterson: “I really enjoyed salad week. This summer I can’t wait to not write anymore papers for Dr. Enelow.”

 

Sophomore Claudia Wong: “I just liked sophomore year in general because I wasn’t a freshman any more, and because it isn’t as rigorous as junior year.

 

Physics teacher Daniel Guzman: “My favorite part of the year hasn’t happened yet. It will be, as it always is, the last day of the school year. This summer, I’m really looking forward to preparing mentally for the fact that I have to teach Physics to freshmen again next year.”

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Last Minute AP Study Tips

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The School year is flashing by as April comes to an end. April’s nonexistent showers bring May AP tests. Between Monday, May 5 and Friday, May 16, students will have to take their big AP tests. Hopefully, everybody has been studying for these tests for months; however, for a good number of students, the AP test that they thought would never come is approaching out of nowhere, and it is really time to sit down and crack open that Baron’s book.

Here are some studying tips for last minute studying:

  1.     Buy (or borrow) a Baron’s book and read through it quickly. Bonus: the material will be fresh in the mind!
  2.     Use Baron’s flashcards to review concepts; however, most students find this tool less helpful than the book.
  3.     Get with a study group-that will actually study and not socialize-and review.
  4.     Review; then review; then review again, and again, and again…
  5.     At the least, read over class/reading notes (You should at least be able to do this).
  6.     Plan something fun after the AP-something to look forward to!
  7.     Disable Facebook, twitter, Instagram… I mean we all say we’re using it for the study groups, but, honestly, they aren’t that helpful and, let’s face it, we are not actually on them.
  8.     Block off Netflix, HBO-go, the TV, Buzzfeed… with self-control app.
  9.  Most importantly, SLEEP-yes, we all hear this a lot, and I am definitely a person who puts homework before sleep, but sleep can really make a difference and can help you work harder through the 4 hours of testing. Also, you need good sleep both the night before the test and the night before the night before the test. The sleep you get the night before the night before will affect you more than the sleep you get the night before the test. Sleep well on both nights (or all nights in general).
  10.  Most most importantly, breathe and don’t stress. Stress won’t help you-it will only hinder your success. You’re teachers have prepared you well, and you are ready.

Good luck to all students taking AP tests. We’ll get through the next few weeks together!

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Community Service Opportunities Around the School

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As the school year comes to a close, many students at the School are turning their attention towards service opportunities. Although service opportunities have been available in small capacities to students, many have taken advantage of the most recent ones. Led by Upper School science teacher, Eugene Vann, groups of students and teachers are participating in the Rebuilding Together program on April 19 and 26. The groups will be working on completely refurbishing a house for an elderly couple in Oakland.

As of April 9, the sign ups located on the School’s SignUp Genius page for April 19 are full. On April 26, however, there is still one spot open. The Rebuilding Together program seems to be very popular amongst students and faculty at the School.

Fortunately, there are many other service opportunities available on the School’s SignUp Genius page, like helping the Alameda Boys’ and Girls’ Club. In addition to the special opportunities, there are regular service opportunities like tutoring after school at Sequoia Elementary School, led by Sophomores Lexi Gentry and Julia O’Sullivan, and helping seniors with technology at Piedmont Gardens, led by the SOS Club.

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Interesting I-Search Topics

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Recently, the Freshman grade has embarked on the I-Search, a project for which each student chooses any topic that interests them.  Since there are, within reason, no limits or parameters for the topic, everyone finds something intriguing and unique.  Every year, the Freshmen create an entirely new batch of research subjects.

Freshman Aleisha Allen is writing her I-Search on “the causes for differences in emotional capacity between men and women.”  She is researching the roots of these differences, learning about where they originate, and how they are shaped.  “The main things that influence the differences are not necessarily biological and not necessarily choices,” she explained, “It starts in the mother’s womb.  Anything that she does, any stress she feels, will be directly transmitted to the child.”

Freshman Catherine McMahon has taken a very different path.  “My I-Search is [on] social media and it’s effects on social movements,” she said, “My overarching question is: what are the pros and cons of social media, and also new media in movements?”  McMahon is also looking into how new technology, compared to older technologies such as radio and television, is making a difference for social movements.  “I had an interesting interview with a professor,” she added, “and he told me about what can be done to help young people and people in general know how to engage actively with whatever they’re reading online.”

Freshman Carla Ho also chose a unique topic.  She is studying the relationship between wealth and depression.  “[My I-Search is] basically talking about how affluence could be a potential trigger for depression, and why,” she explained, “I’ve learned that affluence doesn’t buy happiness; money can’t buy happiness, like the old cliche.”

The I-Search is a crucial tool for discovery and learning Freshman year.  “I’ve learned a lot,” McMahon stated, “I think the best part of the entire I-Search is researching, just doing the research and finding a lot about this thing [in which] I’m pretty interested.”

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