The Hawk's Eye

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School Celebrates Dia de los Muertos

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Last month, the School celebrated the Day of the Dead (El Día de Los Muertos). Students and faculty created alters throughout the School to commemorate this holiday. The Day of the Dead is commonly celebrated in Mexico, but in past few years the holiday has increased in popularity. Students decorated sugar skulls and made flowers from tissue paper. The altar had mini altars from the different Spanish classes, along with the favorite foods of the deceased. Upper School Spanish teacher, Luz Diaz, said, “It is a feast where the dead come back to find their homes where their family will be waiting for them. There are always altars with yellow flowers, which marks the path for the souls. Then, they make their way to the altar with their favorite food and objects.”  Senior Daisy Brambila, the co-president of the Latinos Unidos club, stated that she does not celebrate the at home; however, when her mom was in Mexico, she would “put soap for the dead to cleanse themselves and collect flowers for the dead.” Check out the attached photos of the School’s celebrations of the holiday.

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Directions to Log in Service Hours

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At the School, community service is tremendously important. There is a requirement of 40 hours in order to graduate, which is very minimal compared to other  schools, where students must complete 80 or even 120 hours.

Throughout 10th and 11th grade, Jayhawk’s must keep track of their community service hours and how they have been earning them.

Here’s how:

1. Go to www.headroyce.org.

2. Click on the “Academics” Section near the very top of the page.

3. On the left-hand side of the page click on “Upper School.”

4. On that same side (the left), more options will appear so, click on the “Upper School Bulletin.”

5. On the right side of the page under “Useful Links,” click on “Community Service Hours.”

6. Under “Student Hours,” click on the green box that says “Service Time Card.”

7. Input your information and submit.

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Walking Out On the Walkathon?

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Runners signing up.

Runners signing up.

Alejandro Lara

Alejandro Lara

Runners signing up.

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On Saturday, October 5th, the School hosted its eighth annual Heads Up Walkathon. Although the Walkathon is a K-12 event, the participation of upper school students in the past few years has been sadly mediocre– last year, only 14 upper school students attended. As an attempt to encourage more upper school attendance at this year’s Walkathon, multiple rewards were presented as incentives during a recent upper school assembly. The grade level with the most Walkathon participants gets to select a grade level dean to perform a song and dance in front of the high school, and the advisory with the most participants gets to choose their seating location in the MEW. These rewards were effective enough to rally more upper school students to the Walkathon than usual, though still not an exceptional number of upper school attendees.

Sophomore Nick Tintoc shared his thoughts on the lack of upper school students at the Walkathon. Tintoc stated, “The main reason students do not come to the event is because they are unwilling to give up three hours of their Saturday [to] the School when they could be doing other things such as sleeping.” Many students at the School agreed with this statement, saying that they could think of many more ways to spend their Saturday, all of which would be more enjoyable than attending the Walkathon. This hesitation to attend the Walkathon is often due to the lack of high school participants. Sophomore Natalie Hartman confessed, “I didn’t go to the Walkathon because none of my friends went, and going by myself didn’t sound very enjoyable.” This unfortunate chain reaction prevents the Walkathon from having a large turnout from upper school students. Therefore, Tintoc stated that “the best solution to get more people at the Walkathon is to make it more well known that the event is a fun way to spend a Saturday and a great way to give back to the community.” Popularizing the Walkathon and improving its reputation in the upper school would likely be more effective than various incentives to encourage upper school participation.

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Student Spotlight: Head of Girl Rising Club

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The Girl Rising Club, a new club led by Freshman Giulia Gomes, supports the organization called “10×10”.  “[10×10 is] dedicated to helping girls get a better education around the world, especially when it comes to countries where they are not treated the same way as boys, but as property,” said Gomes.

Gomes first learned about 10×10 when touring a different school.  During her visit, she saw a Powerpoint presentation led by one of the producers of the documentary “Girl Rising”, made by 10×10 to raise awareness.  According to Gomes, after the presentation she spoke to the producer, Holly Gordon, and told her she wanted to help.

Girl Rising Club meets on Monday at lunch in room 516.  Currently, they are planning the club’s booth at the Halloween Fair, but they also brainstorm ideas for fundraisers and other ways to “raise awareness of the importance of girls getting an education.”  Overall, Girl Rising represents important issues in today’s world, issues that are often ignored or considered a thing of the past.  Gomes’ club is an important step towards raising awareness and making a real difference.

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Behind the Curtain: A Look into Tech Theater

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Technical Theatre, or better known as Tech Theater, is probably the least known elective offered at the School. However, this year the class has ten students, eight of whom are new to the class. The class meets in the Mary E Wilson Auditorium every Monday and Thursday and is taught by Jim Graham, who has taught it for over ten years. The class teaches students how to hang lights, fix lights, build sets, paint sets, and work the lighting and sound of the theatre. With all this knowledge, the students can participate in the fall and spring shows that the theatre runs. Members participating in the show have many options, including being a part of the set crew, running the lighting, running the sound, and stage-managing the show. In addition to helping out with the theatre performances, tech students have the opportunity to work with lighting, sound, and even dancing in the School’s dance program’s, FADE, spring performance. For the student’s hard work with FADE, they are able to receive pay through the School’s work-study program. Another awesome work-study opportunity student’s get is the possibility of stage-managing all of the School’s Morning Meetings, Practicums, and Assemblies. However, the Stage Managing opportunity is only available to students who Heads of Theatre Department Kathleen Ray and Graham see fit to the job. An opportunity that any tech student can participate in for pay through the work-study program is setting up and helping run the School’s Winter Performance and Middle School Graduation and High School Graduation ceremonies.

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What Does Graphics Do Other Than the Yearbook?

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The graphics staff hard at work.

The graphics staff hard at work.

Lex Nunno

Lex Nunno

The graphics staff hard at work.

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We all know that graphics is in charge of producing the yearbook, but what do they do they do for the rest of the year? The course curriculum stated: “Students will learn computer graphics software including the Adobe Creative Suite that includes InDesign, Photoshop and Illustrator. Other assignments include poster and event designing, product designing, and identity designing.” In other words, the students in graphics learn computer-editing skills. In addition, they also “make the School fair, play, Fade, and choral posters,” said sophomore Gavin Lituchy. They also create the deigns for the School t-shirts. For example, they created the 125th anniversary t-shirts, along with their own graphics t-shirts. Sophomore Danielle Sitzman shared: “Through all of this, we are always learning about new software, techniques, and ideas, as well as improve our graphic design skills.”

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Halloween Costume Ideas

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With Halloween just around the corner, people are starting to wonder what they will dress up as. With homework and extra-curriculars, it’s hard to set aside time for costume ideas. But have no fear! Below is a list of creative and easy to make costume ideas that should make you stand out from all the witches and superheros this Halloween!

1. Grim Reaper on Vacation:

Get a hooded cape, or just buy or make a Grim Reaper outfit. Then wear a flowered necklace like a lei, a camera around your neck, paint your nose white (how lifeguards wear sun screen), and carry around a map.

2. Cereal Killer:

Get some old clothes and make sure they’re dirty and torn, and smear in some fake blood. Also carry a fake, bloody knife. Attach labels or actual mini cereal boxes all over your clothes.

3. Becoming René Magritte’s “The Son of Man” :

You know that painting with a man in a suit with a green apple in front his face? You can replicate that by wearing or borrowing a suit, and a dark bowl hat. Then all you need is a photograph or a high quality printout of a green apple to cut out and attach to the hat brim. You might want to poke some holes so that you can see where you’re going!

4. French Kiss

Dress like a stereotypical French person, with black and white stripes, a beret, a red scarf, and a baguette. To complete the costume, use black and white face paint to recreate the dramatic look of the band Kiss.

5. Jet Pack

Get a pair of two liter soda bottles and paint them whatever color you want, although something like black or gray is suggested. Use yellow, orange, and red construction paper to cut out some flames. Glue those flames to the openings of the bottles, and add some string for straps.

6. Self-Portrait:

Wear a shirt that is light-colored enough for you to sign your name in the bottom corner. Make a picture frame out of cardboard or wood. When people ask what you are hold up your picture frame. The frame should be big enough so that from waist up you are in the frame and your signature is in the bottom corner like a portrait.

7. Blues Clues

Wear a light blue sweat suit. Make a blue Dog Ear Headband to wear. Cut different sized circles out of dark blue felt. Use tacky glue to attach your spots all over your sweat suit. Use felt or even construction paper and cut out a short tail; use a safety pin and attach it to the back of your sweatpants. Use black eye-liner or face paint and make yourself a black nose to complete your costume.

8. Chick Magnet

Get a sweatshirt or t-shirt, self-adheasive velcro strips, and some small rubber ducks. Cut the velcro at stick the pieces to the bottom of the ducks and the other side to the velcro to your shirt. Stick the ducks all over your top and you’re set!

9.  The Classic Ghost Costume

Not feeling very creative? Go with the classic easy to make ghost costume. Get a large piece of white cloth you won’t be using anymore, and poke two holes towards the center for your eyes. Don’t forget to say BOO! when you go trick-or-treating!

10. Grapes

Get a bunch of balloons (of the same color, like green or purple), and attach them to a shirt. If you want to go the extra step, make a wreath out of leaves to put on your head. Just make sure nobody pops them!

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High School Student-Stereotypes: Which One Are You?

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Students enjoying their lunch together on the patio.

Students enjoying their lunch together on the patio.

Lex Nunno

Lex Nunno

Students enjoying their lunch together on the patio.

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High school is a land full of student stereotypes. Reporter Xena Wolf categorizes a few of these cliche student types.

The Overachiever:

The classic driven, goal-oriented student, the Overachiever is well known for their large repertoire of premature AP classes, math multiple levels ahead of the norm, countless extracurriculars, and straight A’s.  The Overachiever often proceeds to an Ivy League education, and emerges with a career along the lines of doctor, lawyer, or big-businessman or -woman.  The Overachiever is closely related to the Easy-A and the Insomniac and, in some cases, has been known to evolve into the Do-Gooder.

The What-Is-Happening-Where-Am-I-Going:

New to the School and with a non-existent sense of direction, the What-Is-Happening-Where-Am-I-Going is famously late to class, delayed by illogically numbered rooms, a lost schedule, and superfluous stairs.  A frantic halo of frizzy hair is not required, but quite common, as are lost homework assignments and a lack of relaxing free time.  The What-Is-Happening-Where-Am-I-Going often progresses to the Insomniac.

The Easy-A:

Nearly identical to the Overachiever, the main quality that differentiates the two is that the Easy-A doesn’t try as hard.  Good grades come naturally; assignments are always completed quickly and proficiently, and tests are aced with little preparation.  It is common for the Easy-A to have fewer extracurriculars than the Overachiever, though that varies from case to case.  With all their free time, the Easy-A occasionally doubles as the Gossip or the Bookworm.

The Insomniac:

The Insomniac pulls off the remarkable feat of surviving on little to no sleep on a daily basis.  Requiring inhumanly small amounts of real rest, they thrive on caffeine and often spend their lunch break sound asleep, waking just in time to rush off to class.  Homework assignments that are turned in via email are sent not late at night, but very, very early in the morning.  Uncombed hair and no breakfast are a norm, as the Insomniac commonly sleeps through their alarm and must make a mad dash to get to their first class on time.  At times, the Insomniac is interchangeable with the What-Is-Happening-Where-Am-I-Going, though they are  frantic for slightly different reasons.

The Gossip:

Renowned for their inability to keep the smallest secret, the Gossip preys on any embarrassment or abnormality that they can find (or imagine) in any of their peers.  They spend their free time texting and chatting with their friends, usually fellow Gossips as most non-Gossips find them difficult to tolerate for long periods of time.  Because of this, Gossips tend to travel in packs, rarely venturing far from their phones or friends.  They are very closely related to the Texting Addict.

The Do-Gooder:

The Do-Gooder lives to make the world a better place.  Constantly hosting fundraisers and doing community service, they are slightly obsessed with charity and are always recruiting other students to the Do-Gooder side.  From volunteering at the local animal shelter to raising money for underprivileged children, they are always on the move, leaving no free time for themselves.  They will often go on to become charity workers at large companies or a helping hand in small communities.

The Bookworm:

The Bookworm loves more than anything to settle down with a good book and read it cover to cover.  Everywhere they go, from the School to the dentist to a nice restaurant, they have a book (or two).  They spend free periods, breaks, and even passing periods with their nose buried in the pages of an adventure or a romance or a philosophical debate.  A distant relative of the Easy-A and the Overachiever, the Bookworm is never bored as long as they have something to read.

The Jock:

Known throughout the School for their athletic diversity, the Jock plays just about every sport known to man.  Missing last period most days of the week, they play on countless varsity and club teams.  The Jock sometimes overlaps with the Bodybuilder, as they must work out often to stay in shape for their year-round sports.  They are almost always recruited by big name colleges, and occasionally even go on to become a pro-athlete.

The Lunch-Misser:

The Lunch Misser has so many extracurricular interests and activities that most of their lunches (or sometimes all) are spent in club meetings.  Despite their many clubs, the Lunch Misser is disappointed every year by all the clubs that meet at lunch that they just won’t have time to join, so they go to after school meetings as well.  Commonly linked to the Do-Gooder and slightly similar to the What-Is-Happening-Where-Am-I-Going and the Insomniac, Lunch Missers will have plenty to list on their college application transcripts.

The Bodybuilder:

The Bodybuilder spends free periods, breaks, and even lunches working out in the School’s Fitness Room.  Often with little interest in team sports (though on some occasions doubling as the Jock), they focus on building up their strength; their toned muscles are their pride and joy.  The Bodybuilder will always tell anyone who will listen about how their six pack is coming along, craving well-deserved recognition for their hard work.  Lifting weights is of far more interest than homework or other extracurriculars to the Bodybuilder; if one is ever searching for them, one needs to look no farther than the gym.

The Texting Addict:

Glued to their phone at all hours of the day, the Texting Addict considers texting the preferable mode of communication.  When absolutely necessary, they will speak out loud, but even when sitting right next to a friend, they prefer to speak via text.  The Texting Addict has been witnessed to text while walking between classes, an impressive feat even without so many stairs in the way.  Their phone has been confiscated during class on countless occasions, though they always seem to get it back somehow.  The Texting Addict is the electronic cousin of the Gossip.

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Head-Royce Students Study Abroad

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This year, Juniors Tati Doyle and Jessica Tu decided to try something new with what can be called a drastic relocation. They chose to follow the example of many brave students before them and spend a year abroad. Doyle and Tu traveled about 6,000 miles to the bustling city of Beijing, China where they currently reside with host families that only speak Chinese. There are many reasons for traveling abroad. Doyle explained, “I’m a lifer [at the School], so I wanted to try something different from what I was used to and hopefully pick up a new language while I’m here. I studied Chinese for five years at [the School] before coming to China.”

As for a new cultural experience, many students abroad enjoy the novelties of living somewhere, quite literally, worlds away. “My friends and I love walking around the city and discovering new places that we haven’t been to. Since we’ve only been here three weeks, there are a lot! My favorite thing we’ve done so far is probably visit the 798 Art District, an area in Beijing where old warehouses were converted into art galleries,” said Doyle.

In addition to exploring the city, Doyle is also studying Chinese, Pre Calculus, Chinese History, and English Literature regarding China. Tu is participating in the same program. She described her take on the schooling system, “I’m…studying at a high school [in Beijing]. Even though I’m at a school in China, I’m essentially at a school in the US that just studies two hours of Chinese each day. I don’t take any classes with any locals. All my classes are in English except for Chinese. I take Chinese, English, Chinese history, and [Pre Calculus Honors].” While the School community misses them, they are enjoying their time enriching their education and exploring a new culture. As for the rest of her time there Doyle said, “I plan to try to make the most of my time in Beijing.”

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What’s Up With the Library Computers?

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The computers in the library are old and less useful, the lab computers around the school look better and are of better use. So then, why does the School have those computers in the library? The Hawk’s Eye asked Ray Louie for his take on the matter. Louie responded with some humor saying,“ Well because no one asks what they want.” To address the topic of the different computers around the school, he said,“ Well, the computers in the library are meant for more basic uses, like working on a paper or searching something up. The ones in the lab and around the school are meant for more purposes. You wouldn’t go to the library computer if you had to work on an art project or something like that. They are meant for more simple things.

The computers in the library are computers that are supposed to be sued for simpler things rather than working on labs. There are two rows of the computers in the library. They both have two different views on them. One of them his powered by Windows  while the other is powered by Mac. Windows has less features and is less responsive to large amounts of operations while Mac has many features and is easy to use. Windows is mainly set on office work, but Mac is used for more multimedia and entertainment purposes. Lab computers are therefore, of more use because they have more applications installed on them and because a lot more can be done in terms of class work.

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The Perks of Being a Senior

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Seniors Kendrick Baker and Matthias Philippine sit on the patio and do some work.

Seniors Kendrick Baker and Matthias Philippine sit on the patio and do some work.

Lex Nunno

Lex Nunno

Seniors Kendrick Baker and Matthias Philippine sit on the patio and do some work.

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Some optimists would call it the epitome of academic and social freedom, while others may characterize it as months full of stressing out about college, but most students agree that Senior year is the climax of the high school experience, partly because we can bask in the satisfaction of having successfully made it through Junior year.

First off, Seniors exercise a plethora of special privileges on campus. For starters, we enjoy a few seconds of superiority each time Barry Barankin announces “Seniors rise” in assemblies and Morning Meetings. We recently celebrated our Senior Day by dressing up as Pixar characters and adorning the School with Pixar-related decorations. In October, all seniors will have a week off from classes during Senior Week to visit colleges or work on college applications. Last, but certainly not least, seniors also have the opportunity to participate in traditions such as Senior pranks, Senior Ditch Day, and Senior Moments. Not to mention, we also get priority spots in the parking lot!

Some of my favorite privileges of all, however, are Senior electives. These student-selected English and History semester courses add an element of academic choice to the year’s coursework. Not only are Seniors able to choose classes that interest them, but they also can explore areas of study that a traditional English or History class may not cover. For example, in my Women’s Literature elective, my classmates and I have discussed topics ranging from Miley Cyrus to the “Blurred Lines” music video, and in my Comparative Politics elective, I have had in-depth discussions about current events such as the conflict in Syria. Personally, I think the freedom of choosing senior electives is comparable to the freedom of selecting college courses, which brings me to my next point: Senior year is a training ground for college.

Just like how in the first week of training for a sport, practice drills hurt a little more if you are not in shape, if a student is not prepared for the college application process, Senior year can be a bit of a struggle. Sometimes Seniors try to pile on heaps of extracurricular activities or take a ton of AP classes because they will “look good on college applications”, but they end up performing worse in other academic classes because their outside activities or APs are taking away from study time. Or perhaps, you are like me, and you are just passionate about a lot of things, so you try to be involved in everything that sparks your interest, without noticing that you are stretching yourself too thin. Luckily, another benefit of being a Senior is that we have direct access to the School’s exceptional college counselors who do a stellar job of keeping us mildly-stressed out Seniors on track to graduate and move on to the next chapter of our lives.

Despite its fun times and freedom, Senior year can also seem bittersweet when you remember that you will soon be departing from all the friends and teachers you have nurtured relationships with over the last four to thirteen years.

 

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September 11 Remembrance

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Remembering September 11th

Remembering September 11th

Remembering September 11th

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September 11th, 2001 was a day of overwhelming sadness, confusion and anger for the United States, and many other parts of the world. The attacks on the Twin Towers, The Pentagon and a failed attempt on the Capitol building shocked everyone across the nation. These acts of terrorism have permanently altered the way we live and travel, and have forever changed our perception of security.  However close we were in relation to the terrorist attacks, September 11th struck fear, anger and confusion into all of our hearts. The horror of such an attack on American soil reverberated on a global scale, and nations all over the world expressed their disbelief and outrage. With the senseless loss of over 2,500 American lives, the United States of America was forced to confront a new sense of vulnerability and fear. This day has forever changed our sense of security and will always be remembered.

September 11th shook the earth and affected student families at the School. For example, Jasper Burget’s dad was suppose to attend a meeting in the 1st Twin Tower, but it was cancelled due to the attack. Also, a family friend of Nora Sheeder was suppose to attend her job in the Pentagon but did not attend work because her child was sick. Despite being across the country September 11 affected our family here and many others across the country.

Photo Credit: http://www.nevworldwonders.com/2012/12/the-world-trade-center-alternative.html

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