The Hawk's Eye

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September 11 Remembrance

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Remembering September 11th

Remembering September 11th

Remembering September 11th

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September 11th, 2001 was a day of overwhelming sadness, confusion and anger for the United States, and many other parts of the world. The attacks on the Twin Towers, The Pentagon and a failed attempt on the Capitol building shocked everyone across the nation. These acts of terrorism have permanently altered the way we live and travel, and have forever changed our perception of security.  However close we were in relation to the terrorist attacks, September 11th struck fear, anger and confusion into all of our hearts. The horror of such an attack on American soil reverberated on a global scale, and nations all over the world expressed their disbelief and outrage. With the senseless loss of over 2,500 American lives, the United States of America was forced to confront a new sense of vulnerability and fear. This day has forever changed our sense of security and will always be remembered.

September 11th shook the earth and affected student families at the School. For example, Jasper Burget’s dad was suppose to attend a meeting in the 1st Twin Tower, but it was cancelled due to the attack. Also, a family friend of Nora Sheeder was suppose to attend her job in the Pentagon but did not attend work because her child was sick. Despite being across the country September 11 affected our family here and many others across the country.

Photo Credit: http://www.nevworldwonders.com/2012/12/the-world-trade-center-alternative.html

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Obesity Awareness

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This September is obesity awareness month. Obesity continues to be a growing epidemic in the United States today, especially among children and teenagers. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, one third of children and teens in this country are overweight or obese.

President Barack Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama are trying to lower the country’s obesity rate and help children and teenagers maintain healthier lifestyles. Michelle Obama started the program “Let’s Move!” to help battle obesity among adolescents by providing more affordable nutritious food options and creating actives to encourage children to exercise.

Hopefully obesity awareness month will help spread awareness about childhood obesity and help lead to people make healthier choices.  Obama summed up obesity awareness month: “Let us build on this momentum and strengthen the trend toward healthier lifestyles and brighter futures for our Nation’s children.”

In general, the School seems to promote active living and healthy eating within the students. Athletics Director Brendan Blakeley stated, “In general, I think we do a decent job.  We give PE credit for basically any type of activity where a student is being active… Our campus is also pretty spread out and people need to walk a lot during a standard day, going up and down various hills and stairs throughout a day.” In addition, the Hawkeye’s Café provides many healthy lunch choices for students.

Still, the School could always do more. Blakeley summed up, “It’s easy to say that we could always do more.  It’s one thing to promote and encourage students to be active. In the end it’s up to the students and their families to live their lives.”

Photo Credit: http://www.cleveland.com/nation/index.ssf/2011/02/conservatives_heap_criticism_o.html

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Head-Royce Goes Viral: Students and Teachers’ Popular YouTube Videos

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Ben Rewis

Two weeks ago, one of the School’s substitute teacher had a dream. A dream of stardom. And that dream certainly came true for him. Ian Walters posted “Gollum Sings I Dreamed a Dream” on February 18th and currently has around 1.3 million views, and still counting. Walters has been a substitute at the School for a few years and not many people knew him until now. But because Youtube and other video sharing sites have the power to make a celebrity out of anyone, Walters is now an internet phenomenon.

So far, there have been five viral videos at the school (Viral in this case meaning a video with over 10,000 views.) They include: Mr. Walter’s Gollum Performance, Dr. Enelow rapping in Middle English, Guy Tada’s prom proposal to a One Direction song, Linnea Engstrom’s Hawktrax video, “Teachers Dancing Behind Students,” and Elena Ash’s flash mob prom proposal.

In Dr. Enelow’s video, he raps “The Canterbury Tales” at lightning fast speeds for his English students. This video was posted in 2006 and now has around 125,000 views.

See this video for yourself: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M61_L5PT-9A

Guy Tada, who graduated in 2012, posted his prom proposal to Erika Boeckling on youtube as a lip sync to “What Makes you Beautiful” by One Direction. This video has over 400,000 views.

Check out Guy’s Proposal: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5Zym3BoNYG4

Just last November, Sophomore Linnea Engstrom posted a Hawktrax video she made, entitled“Teachers Dancing Behind Students” in which various teachers at the School get their groove on behind oblivious students. Engstrom’s video has reached 16,000 views so far.

Linnea’s Video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8335LQ-cqOk

Lastly, Elena Ash’s (also a member of the class of 2012) prom proposal to Gram Reese-Gawthorn involves a flash mob dancing to Taylor Swift’s You Belong With Me, and it now has over 100,000 views. In case you were wondering, he said yes… obviously.

Watch the flash mob here:  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VbyDjXGPh9s

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Sleep Science Says: Get to Bed

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KK Taylor ’12

When I first set out to the write this piece, I planned to focus on how sleep affects teenagers’ studying habits in school, and more specifically on students’ tendency to cram for tests late into the night. It is a trend I was weary of in high school, unconvinced that foregoing sleep to study truly benefitted your grades, and my concern has grown tenfold in college. In my freshman dorm, friends consistently stay up past 4:00 a.m. to prepare for midterms; even I once found myself up at 5:30 in the morning to finish a paper. Over the course of my quarter in William Dement’s renowned “Sleep and Dreams” class at Stanford University, however, my worry over friends’ sleep habits has transitioned from concern for their test scores to fear for their health and safety.

Drowsiness is red alert. This mantra defines the class and reminds students everyday of the severe risks involved with what we call “Sleep Debt.” Sleep Debt is the build up of recurrent sleep deprivation, and we all most likely have it. Every night you disregard your need for sleep, a tally is added to your sleep debt to represent each missing hour. That number constantly builds up, never dissipating until you counter it with extra sleep.

When our sleep debt grows it becomes harder and harder to function. Declined reaction time and focus are common characteristics of sleep debt, thus harming performance ability. As a result, sleep debt often increases the occurrence of errors throughout the day as well as feelings of apathy.
Sleep debt evolves into a frightening issue when people drive while drowsy. All too often, accidents occur where the driver falls asleep at the wheel. Often, he/she simply drives off the road with the foot still pressing the pedal. We all understand the potent danger of driving drunk, yet too often are guilty of driving home late at night while stifling yawns.

The truth is that driving while drowsy is as dangerous, if not more so, than driving drunk. In fact, a 1999 study conducted by Dr. Nelson D. Powell and his colleagues found that subjects with sleep-disordered breathing (who thereby likely had a notable sleep debt and were often drowsy) displayed a worse test reaction time than subjects with illegally high blood alcohol content.

Moreover, the 1988 article, “Catastrophes, Sleep, and Public Policy: Consensus Report,” explains, “The committee evaluated scientific and technical reports on the distribution throughout the 24-h day of…performance failures (such as vehicular accidents and human errors in industrial technical operations that can affect public safety). We found that these events occur most often at times of day coincident with the temporal pattern of brain processes associated with sleep.” In other words, we are more likely to have an accident while driving or operating machinery at times when we are most likely to be drowsy.

Such evidence demonstrates why “Drowsiness is red alert” is a crucial message to imbibe: if you are feeling drowsy, you should be extra aware of your surroundings because you are more likely to enter a threatening situation. Indeed, the studies remind us that if you ever feel sleepy while driving, it is best to get off the road. What is more, you should avoid the situation entirely and not drive if you are tired, even if that means sleeping at a friend’s house.

Most importantly, it is crucial to maintain healthy sleep hygiene in order to prevent accumulating sleep debt and suffering its ramifications. Firstly, students should aim to alleviate their sleep debt. Since in school it is hard to obtain extra sleep in the morning, students should go to sleep earlier at night. In addition, determining your personal “Sleep Need,” or the hours of sleep you require to be fully functional the next day, and then maintaining that amount each night will allow you to avoid drowsiness. While these suggestions may seem extraneous, they will allow you to feel more awake and engaged throughout the day.

Implementing these habits takes time and effort, but as put by sleep clinician Dr. Rafael Pelayo, “The need for sleep is biological, but the way you sleep is learned.” And learning these sleeping skills is ultimately in the best interest of both your mental and physical wellbeing.

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