The Hawk's Eye

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Halloween Fair Booths

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At the School’s annual All School Fair, many clubs and organizations participated in the creation of enjoyable booths. Ranging from the sale of caramel apples to playing skeeball, the booths at the 2013 All School Fair were made by returning clubs and new clubs as well. Booths from familiar clubs like the Black Student Union and Asia Club were back and better than ever. Although the returning booths attracted many people, newer clubs like the Tenth Grade Student Council were just as popular.

“Our first booth was skeeball. This booth proved to be fairly successful and well enjoyed by many students at the School,” said Sophomore Representative Nick Tintoc. In total, the Tenth Grade Student Council had three booths at the fair, including a car racing booth and a Guess the Cup booth. By the end of the night, the Student Council earned over 300 dollars.

“I really enjoy the atmosphere of the fair the most. It’s truly a delight to work at the booths and the happiness these games at the booths give to the children and how content they are when they receive their tickets,”  added Tintoc. Despite being a relatively new club at the fair, the Sophomore Student Council is already looking forward to next year’s Junior Student Council. “This year skeeball was just cardboard,” said Sophomore Student Council member Jack Huang, “but next year it will be even better.”

Other than Sophomore Student Council, many other clubs had successful booths at this year’s All School Fair. Latinos Unidos gathered several children for their soccer booth. Many children loved the idea of soccer, as they brought out their expert soccer skill. Many children went to the booth making it very successful. “I was only at the booth for like half an hour, but it was definitely successful-we made over $100,” said co-president of Latinos Unidos, and Senior Daisy Brambila. Brambila also said, “Because our booth is so popular and well known, we do not have any means of changing our booth but even though it was pretty hidden, kids definitely came back to play again.”

Additionally, the Graphic Design elective also had a great time at the fair. “Our theme is balloon and it’s really adorable to see the kids try and sit on top of balloons trying to pop them and get prizes they really want,” said sophomore Quincy Mulligan. Because their booth was also successful, Graphics intends to participate in the fair again next year. Overall, the people who went to the All School Fair had a great time and look forward to coming back next year.

Check out a slideshow of photos from the fair here: http://hawkseye.headroyce.org/1761/showcase/halloween-fair/

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Trick-or-Treating Locations

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An adorable lower school dressed up in a dragon costume.

An adorable lower school dressed up in a dragon costume.

Linnea Engstrom

Linnea Engstrom

An adorable lower school dressed up in a dragon costume.

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While many students at the School deem themselves too old to trick-or-treat, a fair number still look forward to annual trick-or-treating on Halloween. This year, students shared their favorite places to trick-or-treat.

Most students at the School trick-or-treat around their neighborhoods, and often go with siblings. Sophomore Nick Tintoc revealed that he usually “go[es] around the block once with [his] brother.” The majority of students at the School trick-or-treat around their neighborhoods because of the huge convenience aspect.

In addition to their immediate neighborhoods, some trick-or-treaters travel to other neighborhoods for better candy. Students agreed that Piedmont and gated communities tend to distribute larger portions of candy to their trick-or-treaters, which makes them more appealing locations on Halloween. Additionally, this candy is often popular, brand-name candy which is widely enjoyed by trick-or-treaters of all ages, instead of less popular types of candy.

Other students pick their trick-or-treating location based on Halloween spirit and decorated houses. Sophomore Ali Simons observed that the houses on Mariposa Avenue in Berkeley are always extremely dressed up for Halloween, which draws out a large crowd of trick-or-treaters. Russell Street in Berkeley is also a very popular street on Halloween night due to its festive Halloween displays.

Overall, students at the School seem to enjoy trick-or-treating primarily in local neighborhoods, but many students venture to new neighborhoods when motivated by Halloween festivities.

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G-Eazy Shouts Out the Blondies

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The Blondies are an upcoming band from the East Bay. Made up of five Northern California natives, ages fifteen to seventeen, three of the band members are from Head-Royce. The rockin’ trio includes Seniors Paul Davis and Zak Meghrouni-Brown, and Sophomore Jerome Feist. Zak is lead guitarist, while Paul shreds on the drums, and Jerome rocks the keyboard; all three do vocals. The Blondies have been shredding up stages in places like The Regency Ballroom in San Francisco, Salvage and The Freight in Berkeley, and many school concerts, street fairs and benefits for an astounding six years. They have been named and among the official Gibson Guitar Artists, and are the youngest band to have done so. They have released 16-recorded tracks, two of which are covers and 14 original tracks.

The Blondies officially released their first LP this past Saturday, October 19th, at their album release party. Their LP, titledPrince Street, features 11 original full-length tracks. Before their release party, Berkeley native and famous rapper G-Eazy, shouted out the Blondies on twitter. On the 14th of October, G-Eazy tweeted: “everybody in the bay go check out my lil homies @TheBlondiesBand at the new parish this saturdayfor their cd release party”. This tweet most likely brought a lot of good hype and a good crowd to their release party. With this shout out, the already well known Bay Area group will have a lot of new fans.

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Remembering Mr. Venkat

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On the weekend of October 11th, a tragedy came upon the School when Venkat Seelam, a Support Technician in the Instructional Technology Department, passed away. Venkat, who joined the School community last year, participated in the School’s first Technology Internship Program in summer 2013 and helped with the ERB standardized testing in the 3rd, 4th, and 5th grade classrooms. He was known around the School as “Venk.” Students and faculty who were close to Venkat expressed how he impacted our school community.

 

“Venk was vibrant, hilarious, magnetic, chic, smart, humble, kind, technical, compassionate, athletic, mindful, a star, totally awesome, an educator, engaging, strong, a diva, religious, honorable, a dancer — and he will always be our dear friend.  I would like to add: he also had the best [hair ever].” —Administrative Assistant Stacy Dellinger

 

“Venk was a fellow who enjoyed life – he is renowned (perhaps infamous is a better word) as an exuberant dancer and gastronome. He made sure to take care of folks and helped many here at our school enjoy a good laugh. He always had a wry, somewhat quizzical smile upon his countenance. A very good person, so sad to lose so soon,”  —Administrative Assistant Susan Anderson

 

“Venk will be missed greatly. In a short period of time, he made a deep and positive impact on our school community. He was smart, funny, hard working and a trusted colleague.”  —Head of the School Rob Lake

 

“I knew Venk through the tech office. I worked with him on assignments regarding the tech across the school.  I hear he had a lot of connections; he taught a weekly class to I think 4th graders; he had a relationship with Ms. Bordet, who was teaching him French. I think he kind of brought a mindset and an attitude to the school that not many other people had. I will miss how whenever I saw him I could just kind of relax and not worry about having to sound a certain way or having to be a certain way,”   —Senior Morgan Gillis

 

“Venk was a support technician. He was also doing a lot of stuff with final site, which was the Student Portal and the Teacher Portal and things; he helped with that as well.  He was only here for nine months, and he made a big impression on everyone. He was fun to be around, very talkative and energetic, and never complained. He was just a good guy to work with. It was unfortunate, what happened to him…  you know, people like that can never really be replaced. But he did a lot of good work for the school, and his loss is felt,”   —Chad Bellani, one of Venkat’s fellow Support Technician

 

“I had a great time getting to know Venk when he came to HRS last year. We were able to swap stories of shared experiences we had in South India, where both of our families are from. We would laugh, as I also had to often forward emails to him, as people would mistakenly email me, when trying to contact him (his first name is very close to my last name). I fondly remember how excited he was about the faculty/staff lip-sync last year, and he got into the mood by donning a sari for our Bollywood number. It was such a shock to hear of his passing. My thoughts and prayers go to Venk’s family and friends,”   —Neethi Venkateswaran

 

“He made all these friendships and great relationships with lots of faculty, and I know that all those [Lower School] students got a kick out of him.  He was just always, he was consistently in a good mood. His greatest impact, I think, was just his personality. He was a good person to be around, and to work with, and to flip that around, it’s hard, right, like if you’re, maybe not your close friend on campus, but someone you see in the hallways every day, like you spend a lot of time at school, right, more time than you spend hanging out with a sibling, or with a parent, so a good attitude goes a long way.  For me personally, I just wish I had the opportunity to get to know him better.  That’s on a selfish level, right, like I’d like to get to know him more, but clearly it’s just devastating for his family, and it’s just a terrible situation,”  —Systems Administrator Dave Levin

Venkat was a good man and a fun person to be around, and even though he was only with the School for about nine months, he left a very big impression on the community.  He will be missed dearly.

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Middle Schoolers with Ipads

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As advancements in technology continue to happen all around the world, the presence of

technology is becoming increasingly evident in the School’s community. Many carts have been filled with new devices such as MacBook Pro’s and classrooms have been filled with Apple TV’s. However, perhaps the biggest technological advancement is the new one to one program with iPad’s for this year’s Sixth Graders. Each student is issued an iPad that they can take home with them and are completely responsible for their care as well.

“For this year, because this is a pilot year, all of the costs for the machines were absorbed by the School,” said Andrew von Mayrhauser, sixth grade teacher and overseer of the new program. The costs incurred by the School include the devices themselves, specialized cases, and any necessary educational applications. When asked about the hopes for this new program, von Mayrhauser said that, “There is great optimism that it will go very well.”

The process of personalizing and going over the guidelines for the new devices is currently in the “second phase”. The three stages consist of the first state being the removal of the iPads from their boxes and the initialization of the devices. The second phase is when students are allowed to use the devices in certain classes in addition to learning the conditions and guidelines for the using of the iPads. Finally, the third stage consists of the students being able to take the devices home and assume complete care and maintenance for the devices, with parents and guardians taking into account all guidelines and rules that must be followed.

“Several leading schools in the Bay Area and around the country have been exploring one-to-one programs for over five to ten years now, and it is not a new idea. We are not at the front line of this, but we are close to it,” added von Mayrhauser. Various teachers having gone to conferences across the country and recognized the many benefits of technology in the classroom, leading to the idea for the iPad program and its approval to move forward with by school leadership.

“We are aiming at daily enrichment and facilitation of our teaching through the iPad,” said von Mayrhauser. The devices are intended to be primarily used for one major project at any given unit, going towards the goal of enhancing teaching for the faculty. In addition, the devices are to be used to help with organization and storage of work done by the students, reducing the need for large quantities of paper. With the iPads, the students will retain their original work without having to jump through the hoops of operating through sources like DropBox and Google Drive which may not function at times.

The determination of the program’s robustness will be seen through by the end of December. Although the program has just started, the faculty is excited for its progress and the eventual benefits that may spring out of it.

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Preview: 2013 Halloween Fair

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Math Teacher Ms. V at the 2012 Halloween Fair.

Math Teacher Ms. V at the 2012 Halloween Fair.

Linnea Engstrom

Linnea Engstrom

Math Teacher Ms. V at the 2012 Halloween Fair.

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On October 25th, the Halloween Fair will steal first place on the agenda of fun events. Every year students dress up after school and help create booths for the whole school to enjoy. Each club is in charge of a booth, and the funds they raise are available for their use throughout the year. Some crowd favorites include face painting, dunk tank for teachers, doughnut on a string, the cakewalk, and the haunted house. New Freshman Sam Oshay said excitedly, “I’m excited for the Halloween Fair; I don’t really know what to expect. I heard that we can ‘whack a frosh’ [a booth where you can whack a freshman]” Sophomore Representative Nick Tintoc responded, “So far, the Sophomores are planning to have three booths. One of them is going to be skeeball, which is a common arcade game. The second one is going to be racing cars around a track, and the other one, is going to be guess the cup, where we are going to put something in the cup and mix it around.” Junior Karan Rai added, “I think the Halloween Fair is going to be pretty fun, mostly because I’ll be helping plan it. Better than last year I hope.”

The Upper School Dean, Barry Barankin, is the man who oversees the entire operation. Barry stated, “The Halloween Fair has always been fun. The booths are mostly done by clubs, so it depends on which clubs are doing them. The fair doesn’t really improv; it was always good and it is still good. I have not yet heard of any new booths yet, but I still have forms coming in. Most of the time, the Haunted House it a big hit. It is really creative and a lot of fun. I would say the biggest part of the Fair is the comfort of it; in other words, it is something we have done forever.” From what the Hawk’s Eye has heard, this Halloween Fair should be the best and spookiest fair yet, with new booths, great food, and activities planned for all ages.

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Breaking: Reading Can Be Dangerous

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This month, the School library is displaying a selection of books that have recently been banned by the American Literature Association. Since 1988, the ALA has been banning books for sexual content, vulgar language, and homosexuality. Librarian Mary Goglio stated, “I don’t think that books be banned. We should have the freedom to read any book that we want.”

However, Goglio did admit that certain books have been banned here at the School:  “Yes. There have been parents, mainly in the lower school, who have come to us and said, ‘I don’t want my child to be reading this book. Please take it off of the shelf.’ When parents ask us to ban a book, we take many steps to determine whether or not the book should be banned. The librarians look at it, the head of school looks at it, and we talk with the parent about why the book should be banned. In some cases we have banned books, but in other cases books been able to stay, but may be moved to a different section where it is a little harder for the child to attain it.”

As a result of these situations, the School Library dedicates a whole week every year to banned books. Not only do they look at the banned books, but they also look at books that have been challenged. Challenged books are books that people have tried to ban, but were not able too. One book that has been challenged at the School is bestseller The Hunger Games. And Head-Royce is not alone; all over the country The Hunger Games series has been challenged or banned due to its violent, rebellious content.

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Meet the New Student Council

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        Our student council members have a bigger responsibility than one may think. Each grade has their own student council representatives that go to a meeting once or twice a week to represent for their grade. There will be Freshmen elections for representatives next week on Thursday. The Sophomore representatives are Jacqueline Cheng, Emma Levine, and Nicholas Tintoc. The Junior representatives are Andy Pelos and Karan Rai. Lastly, the Senior representatives are Emily Wong and Andy Pelos, with our School Presidents, Thomas Peterson and Dylan Carlson. The Hawks Eye talked to at least one representative from each grade on how long they personally have been in student council, why they like it, and what they do for the School.

        Levine, who was also involved with ninth grade student council last year said, “This is my first year on upper school student council. As one of the 10th grade reps, I’m really excited to help voice the opinion of the 10th grade, plan fun activities and events, and work to make changes happen around the school.”

     Tintoc, who also is in student council for the second year, answered positively, “ I really enjoy student council because it gives me the chance to voice my opinion and create a positive effect in the School community. So far, the reps have created the dining and cabin groups for Fallout and we have planned the events that we want to have throughout this upcoming School year. In addition, we listen to the feedback that our grade has in order to figure out what they truly want and what would make them the most content. This position is more fun than people think. It’s not just going to boring meetings. Instead, it’s going to exciting meetings and having discussions that have the ability to make a change in the community and make School a more exciting place for everyone in the grade.”

        “I’ve been doing student council since eighth grade, and in eighth grade, I was the class president with Mazvita Nyamuzuwe. I enjoy doing student council, as sappy as it sounds, because it’s a wonderful way to get involved with what is happening in your grade,” Cheng explained. “For example, if I want to have a movie night I’m right in the mist and I can plan events like that. It is a really easy way to get involved and also, when you’re on student council, people will listen to your opinion and inputs while they plan events. In student council, my main role is to plan and execute events that the sophomore grade may have.”

“This is my first year serving in the Class of 2015 student council, but I’m exhilarated to begin. I like taking a leadership position in the planning and organization of School events and have had some experience in this area because I served on Diversity Council last year (I am also on Diversity Council this year),” Pelos mentioned. “I’m excited to take on the responsibility of helping to make everything run smoothly this School year!”

“This is my first year in student council. I’ve enjoyed it so far, because I’ve gotten to collaborate with some of my classmates to make the senior year the best it can be. From organizing activities at Fallout, to discussing how the class of 2014 is going to leave with a bang, Stuco [a nickname for student council] has been great. As a rep, I go to a two meetings a week, and collaborate with all School student council as well as twelfth grade student council. Stuco is awesome,” exclaimed Wong.

Being a student representative is no easy task, but as all the reps said, it’s also a fun way to get involved and plan events for your grade.

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Community Service Board

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Community service is an important aspect to the School’s mission and is even a gradation requirement. The Community Service Board (CSB) specializes in all things community service and exhibits the importance of service throughout the students’ high school careers. Club Facilitator Naoko Akiyama explained that CSB is a “select group of students who are interested in service and in promoting service within our School.” Responsibilities of the members include promoting service, advertising service, creating new service opportunities, and maintaining connections.

The club is always working on new projects and ways to improve. For example, two years ago, the members of the club made a big change by eliminating Action Plans. In an Action Plan, students would research community service programs at different schools across the United States. They would then select the ones that could work at the School and create a whole new service program from what they learned. Upper School Head Carl Thiermann explained, “The philosophy behind [Action Plans] was that students gain more by committing to a single organization and doing community service for two or three years supporting one cause only.” However, the comity later realized that this was only true if students could maintain those connections, which was tremendously difficult with their busy schedules. Thiermann further commented, “The Action Plan was a great idea in theory, but it was very hard to make it succeed long term.”

A group of passionate students who wanted to oversee community service founded the CSB. At first, requirements were very extreme, but they were soon reduced because many students could not uphold these demanding requirements due to other time consuming commitments. Board members also had to find more local opportunities and opportunities on the School’s campus to take in account those students who could not travel elsewhere. Akiyama mentioned, “CSB is not only interest-based, but action oriented,” and to join the club, students must apply and be accepted. In the Board’s early years, they had elections to determine who could be on the Board. After a few years, this form of admittance was eradicated because many students who were interested could not join because they would have to run against someone else. Nonetheless, all members of CSB are passionate about service and understand the importance of being an active member in the School’s community.

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A Look Into the Institute for Applied Learning

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As the student body heard during assembly on Friday, September 20, The Institute for Applied Learning, is making its debut this school year. After the assembly students were left wondering more about the Institute for Applied Learning. Director of Global Studies Sara McKenna was able to answer many of their questions, and share some of the new programs background.

The Head of School Rob Lake founded the Institute For Applied Learning, believing that the School was not taking full advantage of the surrounding research centers, universities, community service opportunities, and major companies. The Institute for Applied Learning was born from the belief that students should be doing more, and experiencing more.  Saya McKenna explained why she became interested in the program: “It was initially inbound outbound travel. I see global citizenship as something more than that; I see it as more expansive. So I have just been interested in trying to help students gain an experience outside of the classroom.”

The Institute for Applied Learning is a new resource center located in room 501. It is a way for students to explore any of their interests, academic or not. McKenna stated, “It doesn’t take place in a traditional classroom. It’s about taking ideas that you may have encountered in the classroom and then bringing them to life in a real world scenario.” These opportunities include internships, global travel, online classes, and even competitions.

The Institute for Applied Learning is less about creating a new programs, and more about organizing opportunities that already exist and making them more accessible to everyone in the student body. There are three ways that the Institute for Applied Learning is going about the accessibility. The first is a Database. The database will contain the names and information of all the programs, internships, and Alumni ties the School has. The database will make it quick and simple to find a program that matches the needs of any particular student. Second, the Institute for Applied Learning is focusing largely on the idea of networking. The School will be developing connections with alumni, and parents, in any way possible. These connections will allow the School to build up the new database. Third, upon returning from an experience, the students will be able to explore their interests within the class room as well with the teachers through writing or projects.

Through the Institute for Applied Learning, students can to explore their alternative interests inside and outside the classroom. Overall, the Institute For Applied Learning will open up more experiences for students, such as opportunities usually found in colleges. The School has most certainly achieved Lake’s goals in an exceptional way.

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New Head Chef

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For many members of the student body, stopping by the Café is a daily must. With such a large variety of great food choices like salad, cookies, and sandwiches, many people wonder who is responsible for all of the cooking duties that take place behind the scenes. Excitingly, with a new Head Chef this year, a few changes can be automatically anticipated.

New Head Chef Cameron Judge is taking over this year from Alyssa Reddy, the School’s previous Head Chef. Judge attended the Institute of Culinary Education in New York and has been cooking professionally for seven years now. He is a New York native and previously worked in restaurants, but most recently, he was the Sous-Chef at the Katherine Delmar Burke School in San Francisco. He explained that his main duties include “making sure that all the food going out are to his tastes and specifications. And also making sure everything is set up throughout the day.”

Everyone can agree running an entire Café can be immensely difficult and it takes a lot of hard work and dedication, as well as great team of experienced chefs like the ones we currently have. This year, the School is very lucky to have a new Head Chef that is upholding the high standards of the Café in previous years.

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Fall Play Preview: 12 Angry Jurors

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In early November, the School’s Drama Department will be performing the play 12 Angry Jurors. It is about the trial of a young man for the fatal stabbing of his father. As the case unfolds, the 12 jurors decide whether the man is to be found guilty or innocent.

The cast includes Henry Yeary, freshman as Guard, Esha Bajaj, sophomore as Foreperson, and PJ Robinson, senior, Thomas Peterson, senior, Bonnie Ko, junior, Adriana Celaya, freshman, Emma Levine, sophomore, Celeste McBride, Jasper Burget, senior, Claire Harper, senior, Yurie Murayama, senior, Isabelle Smith, freshmen and Pierce Constanti, junior, as the 12 jurors.

Before assigning the parts, Drama Teacher Kathleen Ray holds auditions. Ray looks for each juror to be unique: “Since they’re all 12 on stage the whole time I needed to make sure that they were unique characters, so that was definitely part of it, because I wanted differences so that the audience can enjoy that part of it too”. She also said that with actors she has known for a long time, she likes to give them new challenges.

12 Angry Jurors began as a TV show. While the play will be a little bit longer, than the original TV show, around an hour and 20 minutes, and the script will be different, the gist of the story will remain untouched. Although the characters are somewhat similar, the actors will play them in different ways, which will be interesting. “I’m sticking to the script I’m given, but it is a little different than those other productions,” Ray explained.

There are also some lessons or take-aways the audience can get from the play. The 12 jurors represent such an array of personalities that someone watching the performance can relate to one of the jurors. “You look at these 12 people and see which one is closest to you and how would you react to these situations, and I think you can learn a lot about yourself watching that too” Ray stated. In addition, people have different perspectives, and as the 12 jurors hear the same testimony, they all create different opinions and views. As the play progresses, the jurors might change those views, because they hear more of the testimony and get a better picture. “The idea that everyone takes something different away is really a big part of the script” Ray commented.

12 Angry Jurors will debut November 1, and continue on the 2,8, and 9. Students should come see the characters come to life on stage.

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