The Hawk's Eye

Split Movie Review

Back to Article
Back to Article

Split Movie Review

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






The Last Airbender is often a film that one would associate with director M. Night Shyamalan and not in a good way. Known for his out-of-nowhere plot twists, Shyamalan is back with another movie: Split, the story of a man with twenty-three different personalities who abducts 3 teenage girls, but little do they know, his twenty-fourth personality is about to be unleashed. I had the opportunity to see an early screening of this movie with my brother, Elliot Farinaro, at Regal Hacienda Crossings in Dublin. Elliot got the tickets for free and said that there was a sixty percent chance that they were actually legit; luckily, they were indeed real. When we got to the theater, we were given a poster of the movie and directed toward the theater. When we walked in, the entire theater was filled, so we were forced to sit in the second row. We then waited about ten minutes, and a man came out and told us that we were not allowed to video or take pictures during the film, especially because it was an early screening. This proceed with a video of M. Night Shyamalan talking about how excited he was to show the film, and he kindly asked that we don’t spoil Split for anyone else who hasn’t seen it. After this, the film started. I have very mixed emotions about Split because although it doesn’t have the strong, satisfying ending that I was hoping for, it has unbelievable cinematography and superb acting, specifically from James McAvoy, who plays Kevin, and all the personalities inside him, and Anya Taylor-Joy, who plays Casey Cooke, one of the girls abducted. I would give Split a B, meaning that if you are in the mood for a thriller, go ahead and see it, but if not, don’t go out of your way to watch Split.

Filed under Opinions

Rise and Shine

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






Every day we wake up groggy and tired and exhausted at the even the thought of a seven-hour school day. I think that at least one of the primary reasons is that school starts so early. At the School we start every day at 8:25 a.m. This start time is not at all abnormal. In fact, the averaged start time for public schools is 7:59 in the United States. Now you may be thinking, “Why does this matter? Everyone gets up early, stop whining about it.” While I agree that this is far from the most pressing issue in the world, there are consequences to getting up this early. According to a CDC study, “adolescents who do not get enough sleep are more likely to be overweight; not engage in daily physical activity; suffer from depressive symptoms; engage in unhealthy risk behaviors such as drinking, smoking tobacco, and using illicit drugs; and perform poorly in school. However, insufficient sleep is common among high school students, with less than one-third of U.S. high school students sleeping at least eight hours on school nights.” Clearly, not getting enough sleep can be a huge problem. To avoid this one might say, “go to bed early”. As great as that may sound, between homework, sport, and other extracurricular activities going to sleep early is easier said than done. One possible solution would be to start school later. Other schools like Oakland Tech have changed school start time to 9:00 a.m. I would personally not mind Head-Royce starting school even later. A drawback of this system is the initial change in schedule. It would be seemingly quite difficult for a change like this to go through because it is likely that many parents and teachers would push back against the idea. If school started later, it would have to end later as well. For parents, getting their kids to school would change because it may conflict with their work hours. For some parents, no longer could they drop their kids off at school on the way to work. For teachers, no longer would they get quite the same amazing hours of getting off at 3:20 p.m. Those in charge of decisions like these at the School must decide where the School’s priorities lie. Do they lie with the education of its students? Or do they lie with the interests of teachers and parents?

Filed under Opinions

Final Exam Tips

run+
Back to Article
Back to Article

Final Exam Tips

run

run

Dssart studio

run

Dssart studio

Dssart studio

run

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






 

Quizlet and Flashcards: Flashcards and/or quizlets are helpful in language, math, and science classes. For language you could use them for vocabulary or conjugations. In math, they are perfect for equations, principles, or rules. You can also use them for science concepts.

 

Study Guides: While you could use study guides in any class, I find them especially useful in history. There are a few steps in making a good study guide. First, decide if you want to make your own, or work with some classmates (I recommend that if you do work with classmates, that you keep the group small). Then, either use a terms list provided by your teacher, or go through your notes to find facts and concepts you think you need to study. Type up the terms and their definitions/answers on a google document. Finally, print out the study guide and go through it. I like to use a piece of paper to cover up the answers while go through all of the terms. Mark the ones you get and the ones you don’t. After continuing on for a couple pages, return to the concepts you marked up and go through them until you get them.

 

Practice Problems: For math and science classes, I recommend doing a lot of practice problems. In science, I usually study from the worksheets we have done throughout the semester. Just go to the portal, and print out the problems. Do this until you think you have mastered each type of problem. If you can’t find certain examples on the portal, go through your notes to find some exercises you can study with. In math, I like to review the different chapters we have studied, and write down the key concepts from each one. Once you have done that, you can find practice problems either on the portal, your textbook, or your notes.

 

Concentration: It is important to give yourself breaks throughout your studying; however, try not to make them too long so that you don’t get distracted. While working, I use colors, tabs, etc, to make all the studying a little more interesting.

 

Food: Study snacks are always a plus. Although we all crave junk food, try and include some healthy snacks in your diet. Shape Magazine says that vegetables, tea, nuts, oats, lentils, herbs, grass fed beef, and eggs are some of the best foods for your brain.
Exam Day: While studying for my subject test, I came across a tip from my textbook. It recommended you to read something in the morning before your test. You want your brain to wake up before you start your exam; you do not want your final to be the first thing you read in the morning. This way you will be more alert and have more brain power. Equally important, wear something comfortable and warm, as it can get cold in the gym.

Filed under Opinions, Showcase

Does Head-Royce Condition Us?

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






As I near the end of my final year at the School, I often find myself reminiscing about my childhood, most of which was spent on this very campus. We lifers began this journey way back in 2003 as tiny kindergarteners, eager to learn and make new friends. The curriculum in the Lower School – though nothing compared to that of the Upper School – was fairly substantial, covering everything from pilgrims and Native Americans to long division. After getting over the initial shock of receiving homework, we pushed on through Middle School, dissecting sheep hearts and learning how to write an essay along the way. Now, practically at the threshold of college, I look back at my years at the School and realize that the School has given me so much more than knowledge of facts and formulas; I truly believe that the School has served as the foundation for many of my ideas, opinions, and perhaps even characteristics.

We often believe that our families are the people who influence us the most. There are so many expressions – such as “like father like son” – that directly suggest that children take after their parents. But there are no expressions – such as “like teacher like student” – that suggest that teachers have any impact on their students, at least none that I can recall. Yet students spend around seven hours with their teachers five times a week, which is a substantial amount of time. Personally, I always viewed my teachers as parental figures when I was in Lower School, likely because I interacted with them more than with my own parents. Even in High School, I look to my teachers as role models, and I am even close enough to some of them to seek out their advice on personal matters. There is no doubt in my mind that my teachers have partaken in my upbringing.

In addition, the School does a good job of fostering an atmosphere of acceptance and community that has changed me for the better. I have found that the School strongly promotes justice, tolerance, and empathy as early as kindergarten, although that opinion is certainly up for debate. The School encourages its students to be kind, thoughtful, and independent individuals, which goes beyond the classroom and seeps into our daily lives. In a way, I feel that the School has strongly shaped my morals and principles, which are essential parts of who I am. Thus, I honestly believe that I can attribute my personality and value system to the School.

But these are just my opinions. To get other perspectives, I asked fellow lifers to what extent the School has conditioned us. On the subject of personality, Senior Clara Maxim said, “Personality is sort of ingrained. It gets ingrained more by your family and your experiences than by your school. But [the School] has influenced which parts of my personality I show based on what’s acceptable here.” Maxim also commented on morals and values: “My parents have very different values and views of what’s right or wrong than I do, so [the School] probably is the main reason for that. Also, generation gaps are a big factor.” Maxim brings up an excellent point, which is that the attitudes of our generation strongly influence us. Thus, our peers can influence us more than the institution of our school.

When I asked Junior Harrison Harvey if the School has influenced his morals, he replied, “[The School] has done a good job of exposing me to different types of people, but I don’t know if it has affected my morals. It kind of has because I gained my morals from experience and family, and [the School] has put me in situations where my morals are tested; so then I develop them further. But I don’t know if I always follow all the morals that [the School] has told me to.” Many students at the school can agree with Harvey’s main point: the School has influenced our morals through exposure, not through compulsion. It provides us the opportunity to learn how to act, but does not force morals down our throats.

Not everyone feels that the School has had a profound impact on who we are as people. But many others and I believe that the School at the very least provides us with the opportunity to grow. I personally feel grateful for the School because I think it has been an essential factor in my development. Yes, I owe a lot of my growth to my family and experiences outside of school, but my school environment provided me with friends and role models that have greatly influenced me. In just a few months, I will leave this place forever changed by my experiences here.

Filed under Opinions

Weirdest Super Bowl Commercials

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






Though the Super Bowl was not the game it was highly publicized to be, its Commercials were definitely memorable. Whether they were advertising the upcoming movies of 2016, which included the long-awaited Independence Day 2: Resurgence, or included Seth Rogen and Amy Schumer promoting their Super Bowl After Party, the commercials this year did not disappoint. However, a few commercials made people feel uneasy due to their baffling sales pitches, creepy mascot, or just overall weirdness. Though there were very entertaining commercials, I will highlight the oddest commercials.

When I watch the Super Bowl, the commercial I always look forward to is the Doritos commercial, not because it has a heartwarming story, like the Budweiser commercial with the horse and the puppy, but because of the length the people go to in order to eat the bag of Doritos. However, this year, the Doritos commercial went a little overboard. The skit took place in a Medical Diagnostic Imaging Center where a woman is getting an ultrasound. The father realizes that the baby’s movement follows the Doritos Chip he holds. Once the father throws the Doritos chip away from the baby, the baby jumps out of the womb towards the Doritos chip. When I asked Freshman Justin Feldman about the commercial, he agreed, saying, “The Doritos one with the baby was funny, but when you think about it, it is just weird.”

While it is true that the Doritos commercial was odd, the weirdest commercial was definitely Mountain Dew. The commercial starts off with three men on a couch talking about how they were not doing anything. All of a sudden, a creature, part pug, part monkey, and part baby strolls in and hands them some Mountain Dew, and they start dancing. This commercial had one of the weirdest mascots and like Senior Taya Hardy said, “It was just disturbing.” It is true that the actual game is the most important part of Super Bowl Sunday, the commercials are what keep the mood during the Super Bowl party at ease. If the commercials are not funny, then what is the point of watching them? I expect better commercials next Super Bowl.

 

Filed under Opinions, Showcase

Spring Fashion

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






Spring Fashion Lookbook 2016

Women’s Fashions Tends

Stripes

Screen Shot 2016-02-29 at 11.30.28 AM Screen Shot 2016-02-29 at 11.29.55 AMScreen Shot 2016-02-29 at 11.30.15 AM

Jumpsuits

Screen Shot 2016-02-29 at 11.31.33 AMScreen Shot 2016-02-29 at 11.31.09 AM

Screen Shot 2016-02-29 at 11.30.52 AMScreen Shot 2016-02-29 at 11.31.22 AM

Men’s Fashion Trends  

PastelsScreen Shot 2016-02-29 at 11.31.48 AM  
 Screen Shot 2016-02-29 at 11.32.41 AMScreen Shot 2016-02-29 at 11.32.55 AMScreen Shot 2016-02-29 at 11.32.29 AM

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nautical Color Pallet
Screen Shot 2016-02-29 at 11.33.29 AMScreen Shot 2016-02-29 at 11.48.55 AMScreen Shot 2016-02-29 at 11.33.12 AM

Filed under Opinions, Spotlight

Juniors Taking Advantage of Senior Electives

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






Once again, it’s that time of year: scheduling. Soon underclassmen will have to turn in a sheet of paper with their advisors’  and parents signature on it approving their classes for next year. Senior elective choices for Juniors are always an area of concern, but many students don’t know that upcoming juniors have the option of taking a senior elective if it fits with their schedule. Many juniors this year took advantage of that opportunity, and the Class of 2016 is questioning how so many juniors got into senior electives, which originally was something very few were able to accomplish.

I, myself, took a senior elective as a junior. So yes, I think the opportunity should be available for juniors. But my experience getting into a senior elective was a lot harder than the Class of 2017’s experience. I wanted to sign up for an english elective, but my advisor told me to try for a history elective because english was a required for seniors and therefore a bigger scheduling challenge. I eventually did get into an english elective, but some of my peers were left without options. I did not know this, however, until the first day of my junior year. While sophomores who signed up for senior science electives were told if they got in, any sophomore who signed up for a humanities elective had to wait the entire summer before confronting the scheduler at the start of junior year. However, the class of 2017, were told if they got into an elective when the senior electives came out at the end of their sophomore year, no waiting required.  

While it is clear that the scheduling system has changed, probably for the better, many seniors are questioning why so many juniors are in electives. But here’s the truth: according to Senior Dean Andy Speare, there are no more juniors in senior electives than usual. As a previous junior in a senior elective, I can say seniors tend to be shocked and often act in a negative way when a junior enters what some believe should be a seniors only class. Several of my peers have already complained about juniors in their electives, saying the juniors are taking up slots in popular electives. The truth is, however, that Juniors are not put into electives unless the faculty is sure no other seniors want the spot. Speare commented on the current way to determine that: “In general we feel that once seniors have made their elective requests and have been scheduled for the next year then we should open it up to juniors, and that list should have been done by the end of the current year.”

So, Seniors, the lesson is learned: Juniors can take Senior electives; it is not a crime. And just because you think an elective is popular does not mean it was popular amongst your peers. Furthermore, for very popular electives, teachers will sometimes agree to increase the number of students in their class. Sometimes this action means letting juniors in, and other times it means letting Seniors off the waitlist. But let this be a lesson to the class of 2017: don’t be surprised next year when you see non-seniors in your classes.

 

Filed under Opinions, Showcase

The Best Valentine’s Day Chocolate

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






Valentine’s Day, the celebration of consumerism and love, is just around the corner! If you and your loved ones are planning on celebrating this year, here is a guide to help you navigate the overwhelmingly pink and red aisles of festive chocolates:

1) Lindt Lindor truffle balls: An elegant classic. Ranging from milk chocolate to dark chocolate to peanut butter, these melt-in-your-mouth chocolates are sure to please chocolate lovers of all kinds! Be sure to check out their Valentine’s Day themed chocolate raspberry flavor.

2) Godiva box of chocolates: A high-quality gift that will definitely show your loved one how much you care! Buy a premade box for a little variety, or mix and match your own box with your loved one’s favorite truffles for a personalized treat.

3) M&M’s: Basically everyone loves M&M’s, and the available holiday-themed packages make gifting them both convenient and fun. This year, check out their new Valentine’s Day flavors: White Strawberry Shortcake and Strawberry Chocolate, found at Target and Walmart respectively.

4) Bouquet of chocolate roses: For those of you who can’t decide between chocolate or roses: why not both? Flower-shaped chocolates are fun and creative, and your loved one will also enjoy a sweet treat!

5) Hershey’s Kisses: As their name indicates, these candies were practically made for Valentine’s Day. Of the various options, some fun ones for Valentine’s Day might be a giant Hershey’s Kiss or a bag of red and pink small Kisses.

6) Chocolate foil hearts: The last Valentine’s Day classic. These are sold in red or pink foil and in dark or milk chocolate. Conventional heart-shaped candies are always a good backup on Valentine’s Day!

Filed under Opinions, Showcase

Star Wars VII Review

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






I want to get this statement out before anything else is said: it is incredible! At long last, Star Wars fans, like myself, have fell in love with modern Star Wars film. Granted, I enjoyed the prequels, but they lacked the magic of the original Star Wars trilogy. In Episodes I, II, and III this magic was replaced by bland dialogue, the overuse of CGI, and the infamous Jar-Jar Binks.

Set in a galaxy far, far different from that of the prequels, Episode VII: The Force Awakens is action packed from the opening battle to the credits. Having risen from the ashes of the empire, the First Order, led by Kylo Ren, Snoke, and General Hux, is in a constant struggle for galactic supremacy with the daring Resistance. Without giving too much away, the driving force behind the plot of The Force Awakens revolves around finding Luke Skywalker, the galaxy’s last jedi master.

32 years after the original trilogy’s final movie, Return of the Jedi, the fun is back in a big way for The Force Awakens. The concerted effort made by JJ Abrams and his team made to emulate the original cast’s playful chemistry shows in clever and timely jokes. The Force Awakens carries a significant amount of emotional weight and nostalgia by featuring five of the original Star Wars cast members, including Harrison Ford. After all these years, Ford can still play the swashbuckling scoundrel, Han Solo, just as well as he did in the originals. Key plot points in the film, especially one in particular, are not overdone with every scene firmly driving the it forward.

The level of detail and design that was put into this movie is evident in every shot. Costumes, sets, ships, and props all have unique flares with echos of the original trilogy. The casting of the new Star Wars characters is perfect. Daisy Ridley, John Boyega, Adam Driver, and Oscar Isaac recapture the playful nature of the originals and work together. I was particularly impressed by Daisy Ridley and her character, Rey. Prior to The Force Awakens, Ridley had not acted in a major motion picture. What she lacked in experience, Ridley more than made up for in her portrayal of a relatable, independent, and spunky female heroin. Adam Driver was also brilliant in his performance as the sinister, yet emotionally complex Kylo Ren.

However, to call the movie flawless would be inaccurate. As many critics have pointed out, The Force Awakens’ plot is, at times, strikingly similar to that of the original star wars film, A New Hope. The First Order’s Starkiller Base is essentially a larger version of the Empire’s Death Star with nearly the same weak spot. Rey can easily be seen as a female Luke Skywalker, as both characters are parentless adolescents stuck on desert planets thrust into the center of a major galactic conflict. The silver storm trooper, Captain Phasma, appears on dozens of pieces of merchandise and advertising for The Force Awakens, but she has only a few lines and sees no combat. Also, why is the ultimate bad guy named Supreme Leader Snoke? Snoke is not exactly an intimidating title and sounds more like a brand of carpet cleaner. Nonetheless, any criticism Force Awakens receives is more than made up for by its overwhelmingly fun story.

The Force Awakens presents many questions. The ending provides a clean transition for Episode VIII to continue the saga. As of January 7th, 2016, The Force Awakens has surpassed Avatar for the highest grossing film ever to be released in the United States earning a whopping 764 million dollars. To conclude the movie was genuine and exactly what I expected it to be. Someday, I will tell my kids I saw a Star Wars film in theatres as my parents told me, and that is magical in and of itself.

Filed under Features, Opinions, Showcase

The Ultimate Christmas Playlist

© 1965 United Features Syndicate

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






The Ultimate Christmas Playlist

  1. “Merry Christmas, Darling” by the Carpenters
  2. “Sleigh Ride” by Leroy Anderson
  3. “Christmas Don’t be Late” by Alvin and the Chipmunks
  4. “This Christmas” by Chris Brown
  5. Any Michael Buble Christmas song ever
  6. “Here Comes Santa Claus” by Elvis Presley
  7. “Winter Wonderland/ Don’t Worry Be Happy” by Pentatonix ft. Tori Kelly
  8. “Mele Kalikimaka” by Bing Crosby and the Andrew Sisters
  9. “Christmas Time is Here” by the Peanuts Gang
  10. “Last Christmas” by Wham!
  11. “The Christmas Waltz” by Frank Sinatra
  12. “All I Need is Love” by CeeLo Green ft. the Muppets
  13. “The Little Drummer Boy” by Johnny Cash
  14. “Feliz Navidad” by Jose Feliciano
  15. “All I Want for Christmas is You” by Mariah Carey
  16. “Mistletoe” by Justin Bieber
  17. “Jingle Bells” by Steviie Wonder X Keanu (trap remix)
  18. “Jingle Bell Rock” by Bobby Helms
  19. “12 Days of Christmas” by Straight no Chaser

 

Filed under Opinions, Showcase

College Board(erline) Dictators

Back to Article
Back to Article

College Board(erline) Dictators

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






By 11th grade, students at the School are well acquainted with the College Board. This organization creates and administers tests that we yearn to take: the PSAT, SAT, AP exams, and Subject Tests. The College Board describes itself as a “mission-driven not-for-profit organization that connects students to college success and opportunity.” Many parents, academics, and students, however, would take issue with this mission statement. While the College Board’s influence can be found in many areas of college admissions, the organization doesn’t really seem to support student success, nor does it allow truly equal opportunity for all college applicants. For a “not-for-profit” organization, the College Board has found many ways to make money off of families, high schools, and colleges. When the College Board “connects” students to colleges, it profits from the huge mailing lists that it sells to colleges, as well as from the millions of test registrations and score reports.

Since the College Board’s founding in 1900, this seemingly omnipotent organization has undergone many changes. Back in our parents’ time, aka the ancient days, many students would simply sit down on the day of the test and take it with little to no preparation. The test was supposed to level the playing field and give talented students from a variety of backgrounds a chance to shine. But for years there have been complaints that the test is socioeconomically biased. In recent years, a multibillion-dollar market has arisen founded on pressures for high scores. With hundreds of classes, organizations, books, and one-on-one tutoring services, one could easily argue that the test has become one of wealth and test strategy, rather than sheer brainpower. Prices for “review” classes range from $500 to $2000, and one-on-one tutoring sessions may cost $150 or more per hour. This phenomenon is most prevalent at private prep schools like the School, as well as at public schools in wealthier areas.

Pressure to perform comes from the increasingly cut-throat college admissions process and is reinforced by well-meaning peers, parents, and college counselors. Students are pushed to start the process early, and those who do are rewarded with more chances to perfect their scores. For many, the process starts in 10th grade, as at the School where sophomores take both the PSAT and a practice ACT. From there, students choose the test that they feel better showcases their strengths and begin preparing that summer. Those who choose this path can finish all testing by the middle or end of junior year. Those who start later may find themselves forced to balance schoolwork, extracurriculars, college apps and ACTs/SATs all at once, with only one test date available in the fall of their senior year.

Here at the School, we have phenomenal college counselors who guide us through this dizzying maze, but many students start much later, with far less support. This puts them at a disadvantage. And for many families, the cost of registering for one standardized test is prohibitive, ruling out multiple retakes. Few families can afford pricey classes and tutoring. While most people can afford to buy a review book, and there are some free study resources available online, the playing field is far from level. It’s a bad situation for all — both for students spending two years working to maximize their scores, and for those who enter the score competition without all of the advantages.

So what can be done to tame the crazed testing process and make the tests a better measure of certain innate skills? Many colleges have become test-optional, allowing students to submit a combination of teacher recommendations, essays, and grades in lieu of test scores. A growing list of colleges is de-emphasizing the SAT/ACT, as they feel that a single test performance is far less indicative of collegiate success than student achievement throughout a four-year period. In part because colleges know about the “test prep” industry, a “perfect” score on the SAT of 2400 is no longer the admission ticket that it once may have been.

Additionally, in March 2016, the College Board will introduce a “new and improved” SAT. Changes to the test include an optional essay, no penalty for guessing, and more material that students learn in school. The College Board claims that this new SAT is less tutorable, yet test prep companies will likely lose no business as students scramble to adapt to the new format. Only time will tell whether the new SAT will be an improvement, but surely many of the underlying issues will remain.

Filed under Features, Opinions, Sports

Fantasy Basketball

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






It’s that time of year again. The leaves are changing colors, the birds are singing their tunes, the children are laughing. No, it’s not the holidays; it’s even better, Fantasy Basketball Season!

That’s right; it’s the moment we have all been waiting for. No more mock drafts, no more preseason games: it’s time for the real thing. Experts and amateurs alike are finishing up their final days of research before attempting to draft a team that could quite possibly win them the title of their respective leagues. Everyone thinks they have a shot at winning this year. Indeed, it will be “the year” for many, yet for other, less fortunate players, there will be no trophy. For these poor losers, there will be no pride, no bragging rights– only contempt and mockery from their fellow league members. Everyone wants to win, but there must always be a loser. It is a law of nature. In this article, I will help you not lose your league (no promises).

The first step to creating a winning team is the team’s name. There a few different ways to go about making the perfect team name. If they are not well thought out, then team names can trigger pre-season mockery which you do not want going into the start of the season, for if your team is the laughing stock of the league before the start of week one, then you have no chance of winning. The classic team name of a good fantasy basketball team is a pun based off of the name of one of your best players. For example, if you have Blake Griffin, a good team name could be, “Blake Griffindor”. Or, if you have Danilo Gallinari, you could name your team, “Fried Gallinari” (instead of fried calamari). If you do not want to name your team after one player, you can always name it after another member of your league to poke fun at them, such as: “My Grandma Can Beat Jake At Fantasy Basketball”. You can also be more creative by crafting a pun based on one of your friend’s names. If you have a person named Paul in your league, “He’s APAULling at Fantasy Basketball” is a wise choice. (The team names in my league are quite vulgar, but because this article is for school, I cannot give you innapropriate examples). Usually, you want to avoid using your own name for your team. I’m just saying, if your mother’s maiden name is Rafanelli, do not do something like “Rafanelli Rage”. An Alliteration usually is not funny, and in this case, it definitely isn’t. It is hard to go wrong with your team name, but as long as you don’t have something as terrible as “Rafanelli Rage”, you should be fine.

The second part to creating a winning team is the good luck charm. Every good fantasy basketball player has one. You can go the traditional luck charm route and acquire a rabbit’s foot or a horseshoe, but the best luck charms are more personalized. You can use a signed jersey of your favorite player, although they have to be on your team; otherwise, throw that jersey away. Whatever it is, you should always keep your good luck charm with you during fantasy basketball season, and whatever you do, do not let your fellow league members get their hands on it. Many people don’t have a good luck charm and are still successful. How, you may ask? Their luck does not come from inanimate objects: it comes from something in a higher place. They get their luck from worshipping their league’s trophy. They pray to it, offer sacrifices to it, and if their devoutness pleases the trophy, it will grant them good fortune in their matchups. I have presented good examples on how to gain some extra luck for your league, but each good luck charm is unique to the person, so you ultimately have to find it on your own.

The third and final step to creating a perfect fantasy team is in the research. This requirement may seem like the most boring part, but without it your team will be nothing. You cannot simply rely on ESPN’s fantasy rankings. If you do, you will be setting yourself up for failure before you even begin. Firstly, you need at least three different sets of rankings from three different websites. Next, you need to participate in some online mock drafts: after all it has been a year since you last drafted. After this you need to watch training sessions and preseason games. These games do not necessarily display how a player will perform in the upcoming season, but they will demonstrate each player’s style, which will show how they mesh with their teammates. After this research, you must use your knowledge to create a ranking of your own. You will finally then be ready to draft.

I have helped you all I can, gifted you with as many tips as I have. All that is left to say is, good luck, and godspeed.

Leave a Comment
Navigate Left
  • Split Movie Review

    3/14/18 Walkout

    We Are All Students

  • Split Movie Review

    Opinions

    Roger Goodell

  • Split Movie Review

    Opinions

    Marijuana Legalization

  • Split Movie Review

    Opinions

    Online Censorship

  • From the Newspaper

    Course Selections Article

  • Split Movie Review

    Opinions

    Breaking Up on Valentine’s Day

  • Split Movie Review

    Opinions

    Freshmen Dating

  • Split Movie Review

    Opinions

    Valentines Day MadLib

  • Split Movie Review

    Opinions

    Netflix Recommendations

  • Split Movie Review

    Opinions

    Tips for Single People on Valentine’s Day

Navigate Right
The student news site of Head-Royce School.
Opinions