The Hawk's Eye

Views on Valentine’s Day

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Views on Valentine’s Day

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Each year when February 14th eventually rolls around supermarkets, flower shops, and five-star restaurants all over the country are flooded with enthusiastic romantics who are willing to go far to execute the perfect evening for their loving counterpart. According to CNN, people in America spend an average of $130.97 on Valentine’s Day alone, leading to a whopping anticipated total of around $18.6 billion. Despite the astounding statistics that come with each Valentine’s Day, many people do not expend such exorbitant amounts of energy and money towards creating a glamorous evening for their loved one. More often than not, the real meaning behind the one day, of excessive spending for some, and relaxing homemade dinners for others, can be very different for many people. Here at the School, faculty and students weighed in on how they felt about Valentine’s Day.

Upper School math teacher, Neethi Venkateswaran, shared her view of the infamous holiday that is Valentine’s Day. Venkateswaran said that she does not, “really like the concept of just having one day to showcase affection for one’s loved ones,” exclaiming that, “it should be every single minute of every single day.” Many people like Venkateswaran do not believe in pompous spending for one day to express love for special people. Even dating back to her days in high school, Venkateswaran “never gave importance to Valentine’s Day.”

Sophomore Nicholas Tintoc also has a somewhat bleak outlook on Valentine’s Day. Rather than using the day to express his love for one person, Tintoc said, “Valentine’s Day has often just been a day where [he] reflect[s] on [his] life choices.” Many students like Tintoc are currently not part of any sort of relationship, thus commonly supporting the connotation of Valentine’s Day being known as Single’s Awareness Day. Although he does not directly celebrate Valentine’s Day, Tintoc has noted a difference from now to years past. Tintoc explained that since he is now “in high school, there’s a lot of Valentines Day related events, from Undercover Lovers to Candy Grams.”

During Valentine’s Day, people either go all out to create a magical evening for their loved ones, or people do not overthink the holiday, treating it as any other day. Everybody around the world has their own way of displaying their affection towards loved ones, whether it be through extravagance on one day, or daily signs of love and care.

Photo Credit:  http://goo.gl/GTTCmb

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The Top 10 Songs That Get Stuck In Your Head

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Almost everyone gets a catchy song stuck in their head every once in a while; sometimes the song isn’t even good and you don’t know why you’re singing the words in your head. Students and faculty shared the songs that most often get stuck in their heads.

Math Teacher Fern: “You know that song from Frozen, Do You Want To Build A Snowman? That’s the song that gets stuck in my head the most often.”

Freshman Jake Patterson-Kohout: “It would probably be Happy by Pharrell Williams.”

Sophomore Kyle Russell: “Hmm. The song that gets stuck in my head the most often would probably be Happy by Pharrell Williams.”

Senior Kian Vafai: “Definitely Fallen For Your Type by Jamie Foxx.”

Freshman Henry Yeary: “The song that gets stuck in my head the most is All That Matters by Justin Bieber.”

Junior Chris Wright: “Passion Pit’s Constant Conversations.”

Senior Rachel Simons: “I don’t know, probably Dark Horse by Katy Perry.”

Dean of Students Barry Barankin: “It depends on what I hear. A song doesn’t just start playing in my head, I have a generally song-free head, but sometimes I hear something that reminds me of a song and that song plays in my head for the rest of the day.”

Sophomore Jesse Steuart: “Flatbush Zombie’s Thug Waffle.”

Junior Max DeWit: “Anything by Drake.”

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The Ultimate Valentines Day Playlist

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The Ultimate Valentines Day Playlist

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Barry White – Can’t Get Enough of Your Love

The Temptations – My Girl
Marvine Gaye & Tammi Terrell – Ain’t No Mountain High Enough
Backstreet Boys – As Long As You Love Me
Beyoncé – Halo
Coldplay – Yellow
Coldplay – Fix You
Justin Bieber – Boyfriend
Bill Withers – Lovely Day
O’Jays – Love Train
Akon – Beautiful
Photo Credit: http://bit.ly/1b8eotm

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Is Head-Royce a Handicap Friendly School?

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24 years ago, the government created the American Disabilities Act (ADA), which prohibits discrimination against people with disabilities in employment, transportation, public accommodation, communications, and governmental activities. This act led schools across the nation to provide wheelchair access on their campuses by installing ramps, elevators, drinking fountains at the accessible height, doors wide enough for wheelchairs, and openings under sinks tall enough to accommodate a wheelchair. These mundane parts of the campus might barely capture the attention of the average student, yet they are very important to the handicapped community in aiding their use of the school campus. Additionally these installments save energy and time for students with physical disabilities. Those students no longer struggle with the basics at school and can fully focus in class on what they are capable of, rather than what they are not. Now the question is, does the School succeed in providing the right environment for handicapped and injured students?
While stairs seem to dominate the School’s campus, it is actually hard to think of a location that a handicapped or injured person cannot access. There are ramps and elevators to and from all the important locations at the School. Nevertheless, Sophomore Esha Bajaj, who broke her leg earlier in this school year, mentioned, “There are some places like the MEW that don’t have elevators.” Traveling to the MEW from the high school patio is a challenge since the only convenient pathways are stairs. Due to the absence of a  close ramp, moving from one place to another with a disability is one story. but getting there efficiently is a whole different ballgame.
While elevators provide access to almost all parts of the School, are they fast enough to get the student to their next class within a five minute passing period? “There are ways to get around without stairs, it just takes more time,” said Freshman Kelly Yang, ”especially since there are only five minute passing periods.” If students without disabilities often struggle to be punctual, how are handicapped students expected to make it to class on time? It takes a significant chunk of time to carefully maneuver oneself towards the correct elevator or ramp, and using the elevator is also time consuming. “The elevators are sometimes scary,” Bajaj added, “and bump sometimes,”
Nonetheless, the School has provided ways for handicapped students to move around the School. Freshmen Nina Schank who sprained her knee stated, “There are too many stairs, but a lot of elevators.” Yet getting from class to class on time being handicapped or injured proves to be a problem. Adding on to her experience getting around School with a broken leg, Bajaj stated, “I was late a lot.” which seems to be the general feeling for all previously injured students.
A few years ago, Alva Gardner, currently a Cal graduate, was a high school student at the School, and had to get around school in a wheelchair. Barry Barankin, Upper School Dean, said, “She was incredibly instrumental in making us be more wheelchair accessible all over the school it was great she pushed us, she went to the Ashland trip. She was really important in opening is up and making us accessible. The school accommodated her, [and] it showed the flexibility and willingness of the school to be open and flexible”.

Photo Credit: bit.ly/1b5dzEJ

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Finals Before or After Break?

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In all honesty, finals are something that most students would prefer not to go through.  Who enjoys preparing for a test that encompasses all the material from the semester?  Although finals have come and gone, many schools around the Bay Area are in the midst of studying for their finals.  This brings up the question if finals should be before break (like they already are) or instead two weeks after break when the semester actually ends.  This answer solely depends on whether the student wants to get their tests over with or whether the students wants more time to prepare for their exams.  Currently, majority of the students are happy that they are able to get finals out of the way before break.  Senior Daisy Bambila was in favor of this: “Personally, I would rather spend my beak relaxing rather worrying about finals.  Break gives me a two-week period where I don’t have to think about any school so I’m definitely glad our school has finals before break.”

Granted finals after break would force students to think about studying during break; however, students would have a lot more time to study for finals.  Typically, finals would be two weeks after break, so students would have at least three more weeks to prepare for finals compared to what we have now.  Junior Simon Budker said, “I wouldn’t mind having finals after break as long as students have another week of complete review.  More time to review doesn’t hurt.”

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Best Green and Gold Attire

Head-Royce+students+came+out+to+cheer+on+the+volleyball+team
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Best Green and Gold Attire

Head-Royce students came out to cheer on the volleyball team

Head-Royce students came out to cheer on the volleyball team

Lex Nunno

Head-Royce students came out to cheer on the volleyball team

Lex Nunno

Lex Nunno

Head-Royce students came out to cheer on the volleyball team

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Often when a sports game, Tuffy Day or even just spirit week shows up on the school calendar students find themselves scavenging for green and gold. Or, if they are prepared, students may end up planning their outfits days in advance. When it come to dressing for school spirit, the Hawks Eye  asked the student body what was their favorite green and gold item.
Beaded Necklace- The main reason people go for this is because it’s quick and easy. Also as  Freshmen Harrison pointed out, if your friends forget you can lend one or two to them.
Face Paint- Often someone bring a paint case or a pallet to school. You and your friends can have fun painting on one another.
Sports Gear- For most students, the easiest thing to find in the morning is a team T-shirt. Over the years they seem to collect in students closets, so you should have plenty to choose from. Also, those baggy PE shorts students never use may come in handy if you are desperate.
T-Shirts- This is easy for both guys and girls; chances are you have a green shirt buried somewhere in you closet or dresser, even if you never wear green or gold.
Make-up and Hair Dye- While most girls if they have the time,   will throw on some sparkly eye-shadow, most guys are unwilling to do so. A good alternative that is extremely popular is temporary hair dye. It comes in a little spray can and will wash out in cold water. Hair dye is a great idea if you are trying to make a statement.
Boxer Shorts- You all know the plaid boxers they sell at school events and games, and it seems boys and girls alike own a pair. On a girl they would be longer than other shorts they own being completely appropriate, and on guys it’s a little humorous.
The school sweatpants- If it’s cold outside or you are feeling lazy and need an excuse to dress down these are your go to green and gold item. They are comfy and will keep you warm throughout the day while displaying your spirit.
Homemade T-shirts- Spend a weekend with your friends cutting, tying, and decorating shirts with glitter pens. These will make great memories and you can reuse them.
Knee high socks- Both guy and girl athletes can reuse your socks on spirit days, and if you just have a pair lying around, even better!
 Shoes-  If you own a pair of green converse or vans, lucky you! similarly the Jayhawk flip flops are a great way to be spirited.

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Off Campus Privileges

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Off Campus Privileges

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As a Junior, I am now “legally” allowed to enjoy going out to lunch or out for some coffee or something during my free periods. But as a Sophomore and a Freshmen, off campus activities and dining just seemed oh so enticing! I know I’m not the only one who felt that way, or the only one who acted on that feeling. While many students take to just leaving campus and not signing out, a few good model students will have an upperclassman buy food for them and just pay them back. You may find yourself, just as I did, wondering, “Why the heck can’t I leave campus?” My guess that it is for the general safety of the underclassmen, due to the fact that about 0% of the freshmen have licenses, and that only a few of the sophomores can drive by the end of the school year. But if they’re driven by an upperclassmen, what’s the big deal?

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Are All Views Welcome Here?

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Are All Views Welcome Here?

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From the outside, Head Royce appears to be an all-inclusive community, where everyone can express their personal views. Between English and History, for example, the curriculum at the School teaches students about multiple religions, including Christianity, Islam, and Hinduism. Additionally, the School advertises an all-inclusive classroom setting. Junior Adam Teuscher stated, “The School is a welcoming environment where pretty much anyone can be who they want. I think that’s one of the big [values] of the School.” Nevertheless, the School sometimes neglects certain values and emphasizes others, leaving many students out.

In the first place, many religious students do not feel the School represents their religion. Christian Junior Bonnie Ko stated, “There’s no ban on the School. It’s non-denominational, so I am not being forced to learn something that I don’t believe in. However, I would say there is a very large secular population at [the School] that often times overshadows some of the [little] communities. I would say that I can be open about it, but often times I am overlooked.” Additionally, some students feel that the School does not provide a safe place to talk openly about certain religions. Junior Ariel McEtchin admitted that people tend to make assumptions about her simply because she is Catholic: “I think people have this idea of what Catholics are like in a very extreme kind of sense. Recently…a whole bunch of really super religious Catholics have been outspoken, and they’re kind of giving the rest of the Catholics a bad reputation. I mean I am all for gay rights, and I don’t associate with that kind of extreme [behavior].” Ko added, “I have been on the receiving end of [assumptions about my religion].”

In addition, the School tends to emphasize liberal views, and some conservative students believe their side of the argument is often ignored. Junior Michael Weiss stated, “As a conservative, with mostly conservative values, I definitely feel pretty under represented.” He believes that he has to really take initiative in order for the some classes to represent his views: “To compensate for that, I definitely have to be more outspoken with a lot of my views. My history class last year was extremely biased, and I had to take the initiative to get the teacher to show the other side of the story, instead of the teacher doing it themself. It’s just little things where I have to take the initiative for the School to be unbiased.” Junior Ben Hoxie agreed with Weiss: “The School definitely has a bias, but I can still say what I think.” Granted as Weiss pointed out, “We live in a liberal area, so that [bias] is expected. [Nonetheless], I definitely feel there should be more representation of people with more conservative views.”

Additionally, many conservative students believe some of their classmates do not fully understand what it means to be a conservative. Junior Charles Novogradac stated, “When I tell people I am conservative, they always think I have socially conservative views, but my views are quite the opposite. I am economically conservative and socially liberal, also know as a libertarian.” Not all students realize the differences between the two types of conservatisms. He explained, “Social conservatism has to do with social values, like who should marry who, abortion, and what choice you have. Economic conservatism has to do with the government staying out of private enterprise. When in reality, the private business can regulate itself.” In addition, Weiss stated that students off make false assumptions people with conservative values: “It’s impossible not to make assumptions about someone. When people say I’m a conservative people are like, ‘Oh, this guy walking around with his guns… I fit some of the [conservative] stereotypes, but a lot of them I don’t.”

The School is tries to provide an open environment. Nonetheless, little subtleties, such as a one sided political debate at assembly, reminds students that they School definitely has a small bias. Hopefully in the future, everybody at the School will create an environment that includes everyone.

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Moose or Meese

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Moose or Meese

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I am quite sure that you are all familiar with the woodland creature that we call a moose, and I am also sure that you have all had a question as to what the plural form of the word is. Due to its similar spelling to the word Goose, one would assume that it uses a similar plural form, like Geese. Oddly enough, the plural isn’t Meese; it is in fact Moose. Now, how whack is that?? Instead of saying, “Wow! Billy look at the pack of Meese!” one would have to use the dull phrase, “Woah. Bill look at the pack of Moose”. How awful does that sound? Yeah that’s right, it is nothing short of awful.

Photo Credit: http://www.faama.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/01/moose21.jpg

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Flannel Influx?

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Winter has just about rolled around, and you have all noticed the change in attire of many people around campus. That’s right, you know what I’m talking about; it is the influx in flannels. Right about now some of the unenlightened readers may be asking, “What the heck is a flannel?” Well I’ll tell you what the joyous articles of clothing are. Flannel is a comfortable soft weave of cotton that is usually found in pajamas pants and shirts. It is probably most common in button down form and is arguably the single greatest article of clothing ever to be invented by mankind. The flannel can be found in a few different styles around campus, so I’ll throw them into three simple categories and make it easy for you. The Jacket: Many students can be found walking around with their flannels unbuttoned and flying gloriously through the wind as their t-shirts are let out to shine. The Sleeve: On especially brisk days you can find an abundance of people wearing their puff-daddy vests leaving only the flannel sleeves to be seen, hiding away all the greatness to themselves. The Shirt: You can find quite a few of the men on campus walking around with only a flannel as a top. Using the flannel as a shirt is a quite comfortable choice, and stylish I might add, that lets the wearer experience their flannel coziness to the max, while leaving a few buttons left undone and broadcasting their chests to world.

Photo Credit: http://tinyurl.com/ndpdsdh

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Blast to the Past: Teachers Before HRS

Math teacher Chris Davies in his ice-hockey heyday.

Math teacher Chris Davies in his ice-hockey heyday.

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Here at the School, the various faculty members who bring life to our classes and our campus come from many different and diverse backgrounds. Some faculty members came to the School right after college or graduate school, but a number came from other fields of work before arriving at the School. In addition to a multitude of professional environments, there are also many of ages and experience levels of faculty members.

Upper School Head, Carl Thiermann, has been at the School since 1992. Before arriving, Thiermann was an English teacher. Simply put, Thiermann said that he is “very happy at the School.” Faculty members similar to Thiermann have been at the School so long that have no idea what they would be doing right now if they were here.

“I started teaching at the School in the fall of 1983,” said Steve Gregg, Upper School Computer Science and Math teacher, “so this is my 31st year at the school.” Gregg himself has devoted many years towards enhancing and perfecting the currently robust and very popular Computer Science Program. After completing graduate school at the University of California Berkeley, Gregg came to the School.

“I spent practically every waking hour studying mathematics,” said Gregg. In fact, in college Gregg wanted to become a professional mathematician; however, during graduate school he realized that opportunity was not easily availible. “I became a math teacher,” stated Gregg, “since that is a profession that doesn’t require as much brainpower as being a math researcher.” When asked about what he would be if he was not a teacher at the School, Gregg suggested that he would be a “professional student.”

Upper School Math teacher Chris Davies has been at the School since 1996. Though slightly newer than Thiermann and Gregg, Davies is considered a School “veteran.” Before moving to the Bay Area to teach at the School, Davies taught at various boarding schools on the East Coast. Despite going through big changes over the years, Davies has never lost touch with two things that greatly interest him: rock music and ice hockey. In fact, Davies currently plays in three different hockey leagues in the Bay Area. Somehow Davies manages to put in enough time towards his students, family, and his hockey performance as well. To top it all off, as an avid fan of the heavy metal band Metallica, Davies plays the electric guitar to the tunes of many of his favorite songs.

All of the various faculty members at the School have very interesting and independent backgrounds to their lives before coming to the School. From teaching, to being math prodigies, playing ice hockey, and playing the electric guitar, the spectrum of talents and skills of the faculty members is extraordinary. With more and more new faculty members being added to the School each year, the stories that come along with each new teacher add to the already unparalleled legacy of the faculty.

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How Old is Too Old to Trick-or-Treat?

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How Old is Too Old to Trick-or-Treat?

Lex Nunno

Lex Nunno

Lex Nunno

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“People say ‘I think you’re never too old for Trick or Treating!’ … Actually yes, in your twenties it’s not acceptable anymore, but if you’re a parent and go with your kids, and it is totally acceptable for people in High School.”

-Freshman Beá Rose

“In between the age 13 and 17 where you don’t want to Trick or Treat, and then after that it becomes cool again if you can. Like if you dress up and go Trick or treat with your friends when you’re19 and 20 years old, that’s chill.”

-Senior Mitchell Yeary

“Never. It’s never too old to Trick or Treat, I’m going Trick or Treating tomorrow dressed as Pajama man.”

-Junior Donovan Redd

“High School is getting there[too old], well depends on the neighborhood.”

-Senior Helen Lee-Righter

“Never.”

-Senior Emily Wong

“Sure, why not, never.”

– Senior P.J. Robinson

“I don’t think theres an age limit.”

-Senior Kian Vafai

“You can Trick or Treat whenever you want, or however old you are. It’s fun, you get candy.”

-Freshman Jemma Baus

“I stopped in seventh grade, but people should have fun if they want to.”

-Sophomore Esha Bajaj

“Like when you’re 90, no actually I say 99.”

– Freshman Henry Yeary

“I would definitely Trick or Treat at 100.”

– Senior Mitchell Yeary

 

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