The Hawk's Eye

March Issue

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






Screen Shot 2016-03-21 at 11.45.34 AM

Filed under Opinions, Showcase

Does Head-Royce Condition Us?

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






As I near the end of my final year at the School, I often find myself reminiscing about my childhood, most of which was spent on this very campus. We lifers began this journey way back in 2003 as tiny kindergarteners, eager to learn and make new friends. The curriculum in the Lower School – though nothing compared to that of the Upper School – was fairly substantial, covering everything from pilgrims and Native Americans to long division. After getting over the initial shock of receiving homework, we pushed on through Middle School, dissecting sheep hearts and learning how to write an essay along the way. Now, practically at the threshold of college, I look back at my years at the School and realize that the School has given me so much more than knowledge of facts and formulas; I truly believe that the School has served as the foundation for many of my ideas, opinions, and perhaps even characteristics.

We often believe that our families are the people who influence us the most. There are so many expressions – such as “like father like son” – that directly suggest that children take after their parents. But there are no expressions – such as “like teacher like student” – that suggest that teachers have any impact on their students, at least none that I can recall. Yet students spend around seven hours with their teachers five times a week, which is a substantial amount of time. Personally, I always viewed my teachers as parental figures when I was in Lower School, likely because I interacted with them more than with my own parents. Even in High School, I look to my teachers as role models, and I am even close enough to some of them to seek out their advice on personal matters. There is no doubt in my mind that my teachers have partaken in my upbringing.

In addition, the School does a good job of fostering an atmosphere of acceptance and community that has changed me for the better. I have found that the School strongly promotes justice, tolerance, and empathy as early as kindergarten, although that opinion is certainly up for debate. The School encourages its students to be kind, thoughtful, and independent individuals, which goes beyond the classroom and seeps into our daily lives. In a way, I feel that the School has strongly shaped my morals and principles, which are essential parts of who I am. Thus, I honestly believe that I can attribute my personality and value system to the School.

But these are just my opinions. To get other perspectives, I asked fellow lifers to what extent the School has conditioned us. On the subject of personality, Senior Clara Maxim said, “Personality is sort of ingrained. It gets ingrained more by your family and your experiences than by your school. But [the School] has influenced which parts of my personality I show based on what’s acceptable here.” Maxim also commented on morals and values: “My parents have very different values and views of what’s right or wrong than I do, so [the School] probably is the main reason for that. Also, generation gaps are a big factor.” Maxim brings up an excellent point, which is that the attitudes of our generation strongly influence us. Thus, our peers can influence us more than the institution of our school.

When I asked Junior Harrison Harvey if the School has influenced his morals, he replied, “[The School] has done a good job of exposing me to different types of people, but I don’t know if it has affected my morals. It kind of has because I gained my morals from experience and family, and [the School] has put me in situations where my morals are tested; so then I develop them further. But I don’t know if I always follow all the morals that [the School] has told me to.” Many students at the school can agree with Harvey’s main point: the School has influenced our morals through exposure, not through compulsion. It provides us the opportunity to learn how to act, but does not force morals down our throats.

Not everyone feels that the School has had a profound impact on who we are as people. But many others and I believe that the School at the very least provides us with the opportunity to grow. I personally feel grateful for the School because I think it has been an essential factor in my development. Yes, I owe a lot of my growth to my family and experiences outside of school, but my school environment provided me with friends and role models that have greatly influenced me. In just a few months, I will leave this place forever changed by my experiences here.

Filed under Features, Showcase

Spiritless Spirit Days

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






Although spirit masters Natasha Skov and Henry Yeary have worked hard to increase spirit within the community, the Upper School is still seriously lacking in spirit. This absence is especially noticeable during spirit week when it appears that less than half of the student body participates in each planned spirit day. This year’s spirit week included many interesting dress-up days such as zoo day and Skype interview day, where students dressed formal on their top halves and kept pajamas on their bottom halves. With so many fun, new spirit days throughout the week, it makes no sense why few students participated. Spirit master Henry Yeary had a unique take on why people do not dress up for spirit week: “Albert Einstein actually did a study on it, and his findings allowed him to create quite a complex hypothesis. He concluded that the people who don’t participate think that they are for some reason above it and are too cool for it when, in reality, those people tend to be very boring, bland, and self-obsessed.”

Another theory is people do not dress up because they think it is too immature. Some may consider it “uncool” or “silly” to dress up as a superhero or as a teacher. Natasha Skov, the Upper School’s other spirit master mirrored these sentiments citing three main reasons why students do not participate in spirit weeks: “Some people genuinely forget, people don’t have spirit items to dress up in, and lastly, and most importantly, people find it uncool and don’t want to “embarrass” themselves. This last one is the one that really bothers me, but I do not know how to solve [it].  I guess it’s just a big difference in personalities? I don’t understand why people choose not to have fun. It confuses me.” Another reason is that students simply do not care. This fact is sad but in some cases true. The whole point of spirit week is to display school pride, and when students do not participate, it speaks to their feelings about the School. Students also get tired of dressing up as the same things every year. When spirit weeks have the same themes over and over, it takes the fun out this week.  However, school spirit should not be something to dread; it should be a fun tradition in which every student should partake. It is a great way to support the school community!

 

Filed under Features, Showcase

Head-Royce Opinions of the 2016 Presidential Election

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






Since the Presidential race is rapidly approaching, Expos decided to question students about their perception of potential nominees.

Agatha Lavoie (9th): “If I could vote, I would vote for anyone but Donald Trump.”

Hind Jadallah-karraa (9th): “If Donald Trump wins, I’m moving to Canada.”

Ruth Oppenheimer (9th): “If Donald Trump wins, there’s gonna uprising like in the Hunger Games, and someone’s gonna kill him.”

Avery Lemoine (10th): “You could call it an election.”

Jasleen Gills (10th): “The campaign is getting less political and more about media attention.”

Dana Gillis (10th): “If they can bake cupcakes, that’s cool.”

Winnie Chen (10th): “Trump’s a dump, and he’s hair impaired.”

Amy Lin (11th): “Bernie all the way. I’m gonna be sad if Trump wins.”

Andrew Wan (11th): “Bernie Sanders is good, but his economic policy is out of whack.”

Nick Tintoc (12th): “Trump’s hair is fake.”

Laurel Ettinger (12th): “I feel uncomfortable that someone resembling a citrus might become President.”

Filed under Features, Showcase

Corruption on the Coast

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






Last February, the California Coastal Commission fired its executive director, Charles Lester. Although Lester had worked at the Commission for decades and served as director for the past four and a half years, Commission members decided he needed to go. In an op-ed piece, Commissioner Wendy Mitchell stated, “there were numerous management and administrative issues that commissioners deemed significant obstacles to their ability to successfully and objectively implement the Coastal Act.” Passed in 1972, the Coastal Act established the Coastal Commission and tasked it with designing and enforcing a plan to protect California’s 1,000 mile coastline from “overdevelopment” and “environmental harm” to ensure public access.

On January 14th, the Coastal Commission notified its director of their impending decision and gave him a choice to either help them hire his replacement or go to a public hearing regarding his dismissal. Lester chose the hearing, to which hundreds of supporters flocked in his support.

Despite the issues cited by the Commission, many are labelling Lester’s firing as part of a larger battle over development. Largely thanks to former Commission director Peter Douglas, California’s coast has been kept so untouched that it is now considered the holy grail by developers, triggering a near-constant clash with the Commission. Nonetheless, environmental groups and former Coastal Commission workers alike have sensed that Commissioners have become more aligned with developers’ interests and even compromised with them during public meetings. They believe that the Commission is seeking to hire a more pro-development director, which has caused nationwide alarm, for according to the LA Times, California’s Coastal Commission “is regarded as the most powerful land-use agency in the nation and a model for other states trying to preserve natural beauty.”

My mother, Catherine Cutler, worked with Lester at the Coastal Commission as Deputy Chief Counsel for ten years. She describes Lester as a “coastal preservationist” who “managed by consensus as opposed to just being dictatorial.” As director, Cutler claims that Lester “empowered his staff at all different levels to take responsibility and to have a lot of say in things-not a top down management style. His staff were passionate and committed to environmental preservation. He set that example as the leader.”

Cutler is calling the trial “a clash between an independent staff and the commissioners.” Comprised of a staff and a commission, this organization has a system of checks and balances, for “the staff would make a recommendation and the commissioners would go in a different direction, which is supposed to happen.” Cutler fears that “if staff is cut out and yes-man is put in who agrees with everything the Commission wants, you get a lopsided view. It becomes too slick of an operation, too well-oiled. There need to be differences of opinion along the way.” Cutler notes that “Charles was an independent thinker who led the independent staff, and some of the commissioners were more pro-development than the preservationist staff is. They wanted to make it easier for developers to deal with the staff. The best way to do that was to take out the person at the top.”

 

Filed under Features, Showcase

Karen Lara: Changing the Game

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






Every year, seniors take advantage of their last year at the School by giving optional Senior Moments, Morning Meeting performances of all kinds. On Monday, February 8th, Senior Karen Lara gave the most heartfelt and moving Senior Moment I can remember, in which she spoke of her transition to the School in sixth grade and the solace she found often in the maintenance staff over her classmates. After poignantly thanking these people who are now family to her, she finished with a plea to the audience: treat everyone with respect, especially those whom you are most likely to neglect. The Hawk’s Eye reached out to her to gain further insight into her touching presentation.

 

When did you decide on and create your Senior Moment?

I had the idea for a Senior Moment in November. It really was just an idea; I didn’t really think I’d go through with it. It wasn’t until I talked to Ms. Feidelman and Naoko that I decided I was going to do it. I told them my idea for a Senior Moment and they loved it; they backed me up on it and helped me find the courage in myself to do it. I didn’t actually write anything until after Winter Break. I pulled things I wrote in my college essays, personal essays from my 1968 class, and my thoughts.

 

Why did you feel compelled to give this Senior Moment?

I felt compelled to have my Senior Moment because of my relationship with the staff; I had Maria, who is like my second mom, and Antonio and Bulmaro who have known me since sixth grade, and the rest of our staff. I did it for them and for Latinos Unidos. I’ve always felt like Latinos were invisible to our community because we’re very small in numbers. I didn’t want to graduate without expressing how I felt.

 

Were you nervous about presenting?

I was very nervous presenting. I’d scheduled that Morning Meeting two weeks in advance with Mr. Barankin, and I was nervous. That day I didn’t eat breakfast because I was afraid of feeling sick. I literally felt like my heart was a drum; my stomach and heart were not happy with me that day.

 

How did you feel after giving your speech?

I felt… a lot of things. I’d rehearsed my speech so many times and tried to prepare myself for the reaction, but it wasn’t anything I thought it would be. I didn’t want to cry, but when I got up there I knew it was going to happen. I cried because after seven years I finally had the courage to say everything I felt; I had the courage to be the voice for my friends who were invisible to our community, and I got to experience a taste of what it’s like to be a social advocate. I felt so happy I did something for all the Latinos in Head-Royce. The reaction I got from the community just made everything even more unreal. It’s hard to explain what I was feeling because I’d never experienced it before. I was grateful, overwhelmed, happy and shocked in a good way.

 

How did your staff friends whom for whom you showed appreciation in your speech react?

They were really surprised. They weren’t really sure about my Senior Moment when I first told them about it, and making sure they were present at Morning Meeting was difficult. I don’t think anyone had shown them that much appreciation for what they do for the School. They were emotional when I finished my speech, and they said they didn’t expect my Senior Moment to be like that. But they appreciated what I did for them; they knew it came from a place of love, and it meant a lot to them.

 

Is there anything else you’d like to add?

The fact that I impacted students and faculty with my speech is incredible. The love and support I got in return meant so much to me, and I will never forget it. I hope Head-Royce will continue to grow and discuss these topics so future and current students won’t feel alone.

 

Thank you again, Karen, for your impactful contribution to the School!

Filed under Features, Showcase

The Sailing Instagram

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






It’s been several months since the sailing team was created and in the time since then some changes have occurred. Mainly, the team now has an instagram (@chaboi_sails) which offers great advice for sailing and life. Follow the account to get team updates and announcements.

 

Screen Shot 2016-03-01 at 10.35.24 AM Screen Shot 2016-03-01 at 10.35.43 AM Screen Shot 2016-03-01 at 10.36.03 AM

Filed under Opinions, Showcase

Spring Fashion

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






Spring Fashion Lookbook 2016

Women’s Fashions Tends

Stripes

Screen Shot 2016-02-29 at 11.30.28 AM Screen Shot 2016-02-29 at 11.29.55 AMScreen Shot 2016-02-29 at 11.30.15 AM

Jumpsuits

Screen Shot 2016-02-29 at 11.31.33 AMScreen Shot 2016-02-29 at 11.31.09 AM

Screen Shot 2016-02-29 at 11.30.52 AMScreen Shot 2016-02-29 at 11.31.22 AM

Men’s Fashion Trends  

PastelsScreen Shot 2016-02-29 at 11.31.48 AM  
 Screen Shot 2016-02-29 at 11.32.41 AMScreen Shot 2016-02-29 at 11.32.55 AMScreen Shot 2016-02-29 at 11.32.29 AM

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nautical Color Pallet
Screen Shot 2016-02-29 at 11.33.29 AMScreen Shot 2016-02-29 at 11.48.55 AMScreen Shot 2016-02-29 at 11.33.12 AM

Valentine’s Day Issue

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






Screen Shot 2016-02-24 at 2.06.33 PM

Filed under Features, Showcase

Tips for College Visits over February Break

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






It’s the time of year when several juniors (and hopefully no sophomores) journey near and far to visit various universities. Some stay close to home, while others venture as far as the frigid East Coast. Wherever you go, here are some tips to help you maintain your sanity as you travel:

1. Dress appropriately. Don’t go to Los Angeles wearing your heaviest North Face jacket. Likewise, don’t go to Boston in shorts and flip-flops. Check the weather first!

2. Attend an info session. They can be quite boring and repetitive, but if you pay close attention, you might hear a cool fact or tradition that you can later put in your college essays. Take notes on anything you want to remember that you probably can’t find on the school website.

3. Take a guided tour. Student-led tours are usually more informative about student culture than are info sessions. You can get a good sense of the campus atmosphere and ask your tour guide any questions you might have.

4. Observe the students. Your goal during the college process should be to find “your people,” so make sure you pay attention to the students and how they behave. Are they nice? Do they all seem incredibly stressed? Look out for that stuff! That said, don’t make a snap judgment about a school if one student doesn’t open the door for you.

5. Ask questions. Whether you’re talking to an admissions officer or a Head-Royce alum, it’s important to ask from a reliable source any questions you might have. And what better source than people who work for or attend the school?

6. Explore alone. Don’t get me wrong, it’s important that your parents learn about your potential colleges with you, but sometimes their commentary can distract you from your own opinions. If you’re comfortable, ask for half an hour alone so that you can explore by yourself. After all, they won’t attend college with you!

7. Attend a class. Most admission offices provide opportunities for potential students to sit in on a class (parents might not be allowed). You can really get an idea of what it would be like to be a student at that college. Plus, you might learn something cool!

8. Try the food. Sometimes, potential students can eat in the dining halls themselves, but many colleges have small cafés from which anyone can purchase food. Just make sure that you can survive on the food at that college for four years without losing your mind (unfortunately, not every place has food as good as the Bay Area does).

9. Contact adults with whom you might interact. If you’re interested in playing tennis, try to set up a meeting with the tennis coach. If you’re interested in majoring in math, find a math professor and ask them questions. Find out as much information as you can about programs in which you’re interested.

10. Stay with a student. Many parents may not agree to let you travel alone and sleep over in the dorms, but that is an excellent way to really embrace the role of a student at that college. It also helps you practice independence!

Filed under Features, Showcase

A FAD(E)ing Preview

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






FADE, or the Fine Arts Dance Ensemble, is a dance company at the School. Students of all ages and levels of dance experience are welcome to join the troupe, and it is an excellent way to meet people you might not encounter in your friend group. Students spend most of the year training for their show. This year, the show is entitled Grounded and is centered around identity. Each dance represents one aspect of a person’s self, such as their past, friendships, and the people who shaped their lives. The title Grounded helps viewers contextualize the show’s theme. We all attempt to be grounded in our lives. The FADE show is a physical representation of the struggle to be your best self and allow life’s complications to shape who you are.

The school’s new dance teacher, Katie Kruger, directed the show with student choreographers, Ben Anderson, Maddy Bank, Julia Milani, and Mazvita Nyamuzuwe. Musical accompaniment for the show is provided by the members of Jazz I. The show’s directors have included a myriad of styles and cultures to the dances.

Come see the FADE show on February 7th at 2pm, or on the 11th and 12th at 8pm to support the hard work the dancers have put into this amazing production.

Filed under Showcase

Best Gifts on Valentine’s Day

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






Valentine’s Day is a time for romantic partners to show their love for one another. To do so, it is important that they find the best possible gifts. Although the recipient may not acknowledge that the gift is important, it is still a nice gesture towards him or her, and it shows interest. Luckily, if you don’t know or are confused about what to buy, here are some ideas to ensure your Valentine’s Day is successful:

One idea on what to get your valentine is food. Food is probably the easiest gift to give; you can get them anything that tastes good. Though the feeling of euphoria a person gets from food is short-lived, they will remember the gift as long as it is delicious. A couple examples of tasty treats to get your valentine are a box of chocolates, candy hearts, or baked goods, such as cookies, brownies, or cupcakes.

Another idea is a bouquet of flowers. In the 18th century, people sent romantic messages through different types of flowers, a practice called floriography. For example, orchids represent wisdom and beauty, while Dahlias represent dignity and elegance. If you do not want to give your special person something generic like roses, there are multiple floriography websites to find the perfect bouquet.

My final idea for a valentine gift is a stuffed animal. Stuffed animals are soft and cuddly creatures, which most people love. Their warm smiles and soft fur makes both boys and girls feel carefree. The best part about stuffed animal is that they are soft and appealing like real pets yet they do not need any actual caring for. Just remember, when you get a stuffed animal, make sure that it has a holiday decoration related to Valentine’s Day; otherwise, it is just a regular stuffed animal. Valentine’s Day is not for a few weeks, so make sure that the gift you buy is awesome.

Leave a Comment
Navigate Right
Navigate Left
  • From the Newspaper

    Course Selections Article

  • March Issue

    From the Newspaper

    Advice to Second Semester Juniors

  • March Issue

    From the Newspaper

    The Dangers of Plastic Water Bottles

  • Newspaper PDFs

    February Newspaper Issue

  • From the Newspaper

    2016 April Issue

  • March Issue

    Newspaper PDFs

    Valentine’s Day Issue

  • March Issue

    Newspaper PDFs

    January Issue

  • March Issue

    Newspaper PDFs

    December Issue

  • March Issue

    Newspaper PDFs

    November Issue

  • March Issue

    Newspaper PDFs

    October Issue

The student news site of Head-Royce School.
Showcase